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Author Topic: US armed forces in India, 1930–47  (Read 982 times)

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Offline Bernard C

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US armed forces in India, 1930–47
« on: March 01, 2007, 07:41:48 PM »
What was the permanent presence of US armed forces in the old, pre-partition India (now India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh)?   One presumes that it was stepped up during the war to provide refuelling, repair, and accomodation facilities for the US navy.

You may think this is a strange question, but I have just acquired an example of the US version of Lillicrap's Hone from a seller who bought it in India.   Logic says that it shouldn't have been there, as the standard, rest-of-the-world version has an Indian patent number on it.

So, how did it get there?

Obviously one possibility is that Wood Bros made up an Indian order with what they had available, and on that particular day only had US versions available.

Another possibility is that it escaped from the US armed forces.

Have I missed any other obvious possibilities?

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Paul ADK

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Re: US armed forces in India, 1930–47
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2007, 09:47:38 PM »
The U.S. Army flew supplies "over the hump" into China from bases in India and provided air cover for Wingate and U.S. Army forces fighting in Burma and Indochina.  U.S. forces based in India also participated in ground fighting to keep the Burma Road open. (See the history of Merrill's Marauders, aka 5307 Composite Unit <Provisional>)


Sklounion

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Re: US armed forces in India, 1930–47
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2007, 10:21:51 PM »
Hi Bernard,
I have Major-General Ian Lyall Grant's  account of the Tiddim Road battles ("Burma: The Turning Point"), to hand, so I will go through it again, and see what may be pertinent to your enquiry. Give me a few days, please.
That was quick, but there is not sufficient detail in Lyall Grant, as he avoids for the most part, reference to General Stilwell's Sino-American force which operated in Northern Burma. Covers all of three paragraphs. Sorry, I thought it may have helped, but not so.
Regards,
Marcus


Offline Frank

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Re: US armed forces in India, 1930–47
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2007, 11:13:33 PM »
Lots of commercial travellers and diplomats went to India in that period, tourists too. Could have been left behind by anyone.
Frank A.
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Offline Bernard C

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Re: US armed forces in India, 1930–47
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2007, 07:21:07 AM »
Paul, Marcus & Frank — Grateful thanks for your time and information.

It is obvious that the U.S. presence in India was huge at various times during the 1930–47 period.

I think, perhaps, that I should not have been surprised at this Lillicrap's hone straying from its intended home;  indeed I should almost have expected it!

I would like here to put on record my sincere gratitude to the eBay seller ponypainter for her response to my query, which was intended to establish whether the hone could have been originally retailed in Canada!

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Bernard C

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Re: US armed forces in India, 1930–47
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2007, 09:13:12 PM »
Quote from: Bernard C
... I have just acquired an example of the US version of Lillicrap's Hone from a seller who bought it in India.   Logic says that it shouldn't have been there, as the standard, rest-of-the-world version has an Indian patent number on it. ...

I made an incorrect assumption.   Having just discovered two more variations of the lettering on the underside, this example is more likely to be an early rest-of-the-world version, and so one of the two "correct" versions for India.

Tally to date:-
  • 5 variations in lettering
  • 7 variations in all
  • 2 English language instruction sheets
  • 3 English language boxes

Apologies for posting this query, but then I knew of only three variations in lettering.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Sklounion

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Re: US armed forces in India, 1930–47
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2007, 10:31:57 PM »
Bernard,
No apology necessary, from one day to the next, availability of information changes.
I hope you continue to make discoveries, this is a fascinating subject with all its attendant history, that you are exploring.
Regards,
Marcus


Offline Bernard C

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Re: US armed forces in India, 1930–47
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2007, 04:01:14 PM »
Thanks, Marcus.   I am deliberately keeping my little project to Wood Bros products with lettering, to make it realistic to complete.  However, the wider history of glassmaking in Yorkshire is quite fascinating, and I don't think many really appreciate the impact that great innovators like Dan Rylands had on the industry as a whole.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


 

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