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Author Topic: Peloton Fairy Lamp  (Read 852 times)

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Offline Jim Sapp

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Peloton Fairy Lamp
« on: March 07, 2007, 04:56:58 AM »
I know there must be Peloton collectors out there.  Does anyone know the origin of this Peloton fairy lamp?

http://www.fairy-lamp.com/Fairylamp/U-325.jpg

It is a typical design registered by Samuel Clarke in the late 1800's.  Unfortunately, however, I don't have a clue who may have made it for him or even who the major producers of Peloton glass were.   Is there a chance this is a product of the US.....perhaps Phoenix Glass.  Or, is it English/European in origin.  Help if you can.

Jim
www.fairylampclub.com



Offline heartofglass

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Re: Peloton Fairy Lamp
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2007, 06:02:46 AM »
Hi Jim,
wow, this is a dream item of mine! It's stunning!  :)
I collect Peloton glass & have 26 examples; a variety of vases, baskets, bowls, a preserve jar, a toothpick holder & a single epergne, but I have not been able to get a fairy lamp in Peloton. You are very lucky indeed!
Peloton glass is one of the rarer types of Victorian art glass. It was first patented on October 25, 1880, by Wilhelm Kralik in Bohemia. He was working for the Harrach glassworks at the time.
See this link for more details:
http://www.glasscollector.net/Peloton/Harrach%20Peloton.html
Now, there are a number of variants of Peloton glass. As you can see from the above article, the Harrach type seems to mainly feature the single-colour threads on clear glass, sometimes with enamelled designs.
There are other types of Peloton feature multicoloured threads on opaque white or coloured cased glass (like your wonderful fairy lamp). There is also Peloton with satin finishes, overshot finishes, & the thread colours can vary from candy-coloured pastels to bright reds, oranges & blues. Sometimes the threads stand out proud from the surface, creating a distinctive texture, while on other pieces, they are totally marvered in & smooth.
There are (yet to be conclusively proved) theories that Peloton glass was copied by glassmakers in Stourbridge (eg. Thomas Webb, Stevens & Williams, Boulton & Mills) in England, & the Mt. Washington Glassworks in the U.S.
These pieces are believed to be the some of the ones with coloured threads on opaque white or coloured glass. However, this is still only hearsay. Until a catalogue of the time comes to light that feature Peloton glass by any of these fims, these theories about English & American Peloton glass will remain just that-theories.
Harrach was apparently not the only Bohemian maker of Peloton glass, either. Other firms (as yet un-named) copied it, & this probably accounts for the many variations in the technique, finish, & colour of Peloton items. My opinion is that most Peloton glass has a Bohemian origin, but I do believe that it is possible some of the great Stourbridge glassworks produced it too. There are a few Peloton items I have obtained from English sellers that do have a Stourbridge "look", in terms of their very fancy designs which are to be seen on other products of the same era from these glasshouses.
Sorry if this has not been much help! Peloton glass is very little documented & just as rare. My love for it seems only increased by these factors, however! ::)
Congratulations on obtaining this wonderful piece, & if you ever tire of it, you know who to get in touch with! ;)






Marinka.
More glass than class!


Offline mhgcgolfclub

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Re: Peloton Fairy Lamp
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2007, 08:33:05 AM »
Hi

To be honest I had not heard of Peloton glass although I do collect Bohemian, I do have a large bowl which looks like this glass , it came from an auction about 3 years ago and was sold as Kralik or possibly Palme-Konig, reading this thread was Kralik the designer and Harrach the maker of this bowl




Mod: Photo's uploaded to GlassGallery:
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-6013
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-6012
Roy


Offline heartofglass

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Re: Peloton Fairy Lamp
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2007, 11:52:55 AM »
Hi Roy,
your bowl has a Pallme-Koenig look to it in terms of the shape. Pallme-Koenig did a lot of threaded glass but typically the threads are wrapped around the item- more applied trails than short threads, which is the Peloton technique. It has a look of Peloton as the threads are short & broken-up, not trailed in the usual style of Pallme-Koenig glass of the late 19th century.
In terms of designers, there were a number of Kraliks involved in glass design. The original concept & patent were made by Wilhelm Kralik in 1880 whilst in the employ of Harrach.
There was a glasshouse run by another Kralik (Myer's Neffe) & this glasshouse is the one renowned for an applied trail/threaded style. These pieces are often iridised. Others have applied flowers & fruit designs.
This vase is very similar in shape to a known Pallme-Koenig vase in my posession which has the more typical long trailed threads with an iridised finish.
Your vase does seem to meet the obvious criteria for Peloton glass in terms of it's threading technique. However, it looks more like a Pallme-Koenig piece than a Harrach one. Glasshouses did (& still do) copy each other's designs. If a decorating style becomes popular then others will make their own versions to cash in.
Marinka.
More glass than class!


Offline heartofglass

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Re: Peloton Fairy Lamp
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2007, 12:03:47 PM »
By the way, here is a link to a recent thread on Peloton glass that features a photro of some of my Peloton glass. The small pink threads on clear glass vase I believe to be Harrach Peloton.
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,9074.msg76729.html#msg76729
Marinka.
More glass than class!

 

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