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Author Topic: Stunning Alabaster Glass / Opaline Perfume Bottle. Bohemia ca. 1820-1840  (Read 554 times)

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Offline antonizz

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Yes I will buy the whole I-VII Band this year.

And yes I really love this glass. I also have some good pieces from France, which date back to +/- 1825.
(Restoration period) / Charles X.

Perfume bottles, painted by Jean-Baptiste Desvignes.

And a Baccarat casket, painted by Jean-Francois Robert.

I don't know if those names ring any bells to you.
But you can find more of it online.

Offline flying free

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Lovely - I absolutely love early (1820s to 1850) French opaline glass.  Extremely gorgeous colours and lovely shapes especially the perfume bottles.
There is a great book, Baguiers et Verres a Boire (Leon Darnis), I would recommend but in French - you will need to translate :)  Sorry.

Offline antonizz

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I'll do it with the pictures haha.

Do you might know of any of useful books or documents which are free to download?

Offline antonizz

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Good News!!!

I eventually dìd receive a response from the Passau Museum.
It is indeed the exact same bottles, and my cap is the original one.

_______________________
Email:
Wie Sie schreiben befindet sich der exakt gleiche Flakon bei uns im Glasmuseum.
Der Stöpsel ist bei Ihnen allerdings original, der unsere nicht.

Wir haben leider auch nicht mehr Informationen zu diesem Flakon, außer der groben Zuordnung in der Vitrine:
Neuwelt in Nordböhmen oder Hoffnungstal in Schlesien, 1830-1850.

Mit freundlichen  Grüßen

Glasmuseum Passau
_______________________

I'm very glad that they've confirmed it's the same.
Unfortunately they didn't have any other information about it.

Despite from it possibly being made in Neuwelt or Hoffnungsthal.

I only know Neuwelt from the Harrach company.
Not sure how many factories there must have been.

Also, I can't find any other bottle that's even coming close to this style.
It's not just the turban cut. It's the whole shape and design.

I'm very happy with this find!

Offline flying free

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I've not translated this so no idea if it has interesting info relevant to your piece but here is some info on Preußler a glassmaking family from Hoffnungstal if I understood it correctly:

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preu%C3%9Fler_(Glasmacher)

Within the text it does say re one of their glasshutte:
'Eight years before his death, Christian Benjamin Preußler handed over the Karlstaler Hütte to his son-in-law Franz Pohl in 1840, who was married to Amalia Preußler.'
I think Franz Pohl was Josephinenhutte?

But I may be getting confused.  I find the history very difficult to follow because the families were linked, the names are remarkably confusing and similar and I forget which year which factories were in practise.  I thought Josephinenhutte was later than 1830 but could be wrong.]

Oooh however there is more information here:
https://antikes-glas.de/glas-josephinenhuette-c-8.html

Source: Antikes Neuwirth - quote:
'In 1617, the Schaffgotsch landlords granted permission for the construction and operation of a glassworks to another glassmaking family (Preußler) from Bohemia. The Preußlers operated the hut for over 200 years. In 1841, the landlords Schaffgotsch in the district of Weißbachtal founded a third glassworks, which opened on 7 July 1842 and was called "Josephinenhütte". Their leader was until 1882 Franz Pohl, a son-in-law of the last Preussler. (my bold) The Josephinenhütte developed into the most important industrial enterprise of the place and was until 1923 in the possession of the family Schaffgotsch. In the same year, the merger with the Heckert glassworks in Petersdorf and the Hermsdorf firm Neumann & Staebe took place at the "Josephinenhütte A. G.", which remained in operation until 1945. After the transition to Poland, production in Schreiberhau was continued from 1946, with some of the old workforce continuing to work partly under duress, partly because of material incentives. After a lost trial of Franz Schaffgotsch founded the "New Josephinenhütte" in Schwäbisch Gmünd the company had to change its name to "Huta Szkła Julia" in 1956 [3]. The hut is now closed. Smaller companies in the region continue the glassmaking tradition.'

Offline flying free

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See my amended added text above for more information :)

So Passau are suggesting either Neuwelt or Josephinenhutte I think.

Offline antonizz

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Thank you!

You're obviously way more educated on this stuff.

I hardly know of the "huttes".
In which the region they would be located, and how many factories there were, etc.
Which ones were specialised in what kind of style.

I must say that I haven't ever took the time to educated on that.

I was already proud of learning the difference between the french and bohemian opalines
some 2 years ago.

I ready have to spend (even) more time on this

 

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