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Author Topic: ‘Johnson-Matthey Crinkle’-type texturing of Cristaloc, de Rupel, Boom …….”  (Read 1748 times)

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Offline Jay

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As part of our research into Belgian factory glass we are investigating a range called Crystaloc, and manufactured by de Rupel glassworks in Boom, Belgium.
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-5901
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-5900


This is a form of glass that has 'flecks' of coloured glass applied to the surface to create an effect like a spray gun.

We have also found a few examples of a similar technique in the UK, but (knowing the way the glass industry works) I guess that there is a (much?) longer list of products using this (or similar) technique.

In Holland the technique is called 'suikerglas' or sugar-glass because of the granular surface. I've no idea what it was called elsewhere, so maybe that's why I can't find anything in the reference books, etc.

Can anyone else recognise this (typically 50's) technique? How widely was it produced? etc. etc. all tips appreciated!!
Dutch 20th Century Factory Glass


Offline Anne

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Re: Sugar Glass by de Rupel, Boom, Belgium (and by which others?)
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2007, 11:11:00 PM »
Jay, this looks very much like Johnson Matthey Crinkles. See David's advert copy here:
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-2593 and the topic here where these were discussed:
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,2233.0.html


Offline Ivo

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Re: Sugar Glass by de Rupel, Boom, Belgium (and by which others?)
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2007, 06:24:49 AM »
Another misunderstanding in the making.... "Suikerglas" is the Dutch term for what is known in English as "Overshot glass" - and this is a different technique from the 1950s sprayed on Johnson & Matthey processes.

In "overshot"the glass is rolled in ground frit before being blown out and the articles made in this technique are almost identical in shape and finish to the Incised ware you know as "frisian" - and from the same period.
Ivo
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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Sugar Glass by de Rupel, Boom, Belgium (and by which others?)
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2007, 06:53:03 AM »
Can we see a close up of the texture please Jay


Offline Jay

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Re: Sugar Glass by de Rupel, Boom, Belgium (and by which others?)
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2007, 07:48:34 AM »
The best I can manage on the instant for Christine.
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-5902

Ivo, I understand the technique but would much appreciate a foto reference so that I can picture the result.
Are we talking about 'crackle glass' which is often (mistakenly) called 'ijsglas' (iceglass)  in the markets?
Is there an example of 'overshot technique' lurking in the galleries?
http://www.glass.co.nz/overshot.htm (?)
Well that clearly is some other kind of beastie! Let's not be distracted by the diverse crystallations of sugars.
I've looked through a dozen googlinks for 'overshot glass' and I'm not seeing anything which really resembles this granular texture.

The Boom product is very smooth to the touch and, of the available techniques I would think that a flux which was burned off in the oven seems the most likely. (The english? examples we have, including hyacinth vases, are rather rougher (almost sandpapery) to the finger)
This surface is really very similar to Rozendaal's Oranjevaas, where the intention was to resemble orangepeel, and that's a good indication of the feel of crystaloc

I'm sure you must have seen as many of these textured items as I have, so what do YOU call them (in Dutch)?

PS. I',m waiting to have the brand's spelling confirmed by an expert, it may be called 'Cristalor' rather than 'Cristaloc'!

PPS I also read through the threads and remaining pics, but can't find anything that really looks/sounds similar enough.

Dutch 20th Century Factory Glass


Offline Ivo

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Re: Sugar Glass by de Rupel, Boom, Belgium (and by which others?)
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2007, 09:07:55 AM »
I think the article you link to is an excellent reference of overshot (aka suikerglas) with a clear photograph.  The JM fire-on techniques from the 1950s/60s used by many producers all over Europe (France, Italy, England, Belgium) may result in a bubbly surface, but the term "suikerglas"  only applies to the antique overshot described.

Overshot bears no relation to the crackle technique. The term "ice glass" is correctly used for crackle; the effect is achieved by dipping the hot glass in a bucket of ice water before re-fusing in the oven or re-covering it in another layer of glass. That is where it obtained its name.

http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-5904
and
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-5903
Ivo
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Offline Jay

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Re: Sugar Glass by de Rupel, Boom, Belgium (and by which others?)
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2007, 09:54:21 AM »
It's still really hard to see the Johnson Matthey 'Crinkles' effect in the advert image. Can someone supply/refer a 'known' example with a close up for comparison, please?
(I'd be quite content with the explanation that it's a 'resist' technique, since IMHO this is consistant with the patterning.)

It would also be really helpful to know which factories ' in France, Italy, England, Belgium' have already been identified as producers.

and... am I the only person who likes these things?
Dutch 20th Century Factory Glass


Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Sugar Glass by de Rupel, Boom, Belgium (and by which others?)
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2007, 12:26:17 PM »
This uranium glass bowl has the crinkles effect and I'm pretty sure its not English and this Chance Spiderweb definitely has Johnson Matthey crinkles and so does its pickle jar mate. They definitely are English


Offline Jay

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Lovely Christine, thanks. That definitely looks like the same stuff!
Dutch 20th Century Factory Glass


Offline David E

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Heck, I've only been offline for a few hours!  ;D But thanks to Christine, Anne and Ivo.

Worth noting, Jay, that the Matthey Crinkles effect was first announced in the late 1930s. However, I'm not 100% sure whether Chance did adopt this for Spiderweb in 1950, or adapted their own version.

Also note that the texture could vary quite widely in 'coarseness' - some manufacturers used a very fine 'frit' that almost looked like a satin finish.

If you need a higher resolution copy of the advert, please let me know and I'll mail it across.
David
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