Author Topic: Stevens and Williams or what...........  (Read 2402 times)

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Offline zidori

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Stevens and Williams or what...........
« on: April 01, 2007, 03:52:13 PM »
This bowl is 4 inches high and 7.5 inches in diametr at the top. It has a spiral ribbon of colour, alternating from blue to green, running from top to base. The base shows the signs of wear associated with age/use and has a sunken pontil.
In Miller Collectables Price guide 2004 (page 299) there is a picture of a Stevens and Williams pink and green rainbow bowl and it makes mention of a blue and green version. Could this be an example?
Ronnie

http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-6121
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-6123


Offline Bernard C

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Re: Stevens and Williams or what...........
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2007, 06:10:19 PM »
Ronnie — Yes, it's Stevens & Williams Rainbow, or, more correctly by then, Royal Brierley Rainbow.   Popularly dated to the late 1930s, although I've seen no evidence to substantiate this.   Most examples are two-colour, a few three-colour.   All three S&W / RB pontil finishes — rough, neatly ground, and feature.   Some large examples have cut windows, see Dodsworth BGbtW.   Some examples are optic moulded.

Best known colour combination is blue/green;  best known shape is the posy mushroom.

A collection of as many shapes as you can find is an invaluable resource for learning 1930s RB art glass, otherwise poorly documented and often difficult.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline zidori

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Re: Stevens and Williams or what...........
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2007, 06:15:58 PM »
Thank you very much Bernard for confirming my tentative guess. I am getting better at these things.
Regards
Ronnie


Offline nigel benson

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Re: Stevens and Williams or what...........
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2007, 07:34:39 PM »
Hello Ronnie,

Yes as Bernard says, 1930's and 1950's Royal Brierley. The colourways are: green and blue; green and pink; and blue and pink.

Most have horizontal optic moulding, although there is also a version with a ripple-moulding, similar to that used on Constance Spry pieces that were also made by R/B. Some pieces are cut all over, others have bands of cutting, usually positioned below the rim.

I'm not clear what you mean here though Bernard,

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All three S&W / RB pontil finishes — rough, neatly ground, and feature.

Nigel


Offline zidori

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Re: Stevens and Williams or what...........
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2007, 09:23:26 PM »
Thank you Nigel. At least I was able to track it down this time though I didn't have the confidence or experience to believe myself. Now that I have washed all the car boot grime from it, it is a stunning piece and in excellent condition.
Regards
Ronnie


Offline Bernard C

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Re: Stevens and Williams or what...........
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2007, 09:52:38 AM »
Quote
... Popularly dated to the late 1930s, although I've seen no evidence to substantiate this. ...

Ronnie & Nigel — Correction, as I have seen evidence.   Dodsworth quotes a 1938 pattern number for the example illustrated in BGbtW.   As this is a top of the range luxury example with cut windows, it seems reasonable to deduce that Rainbow had been around for a while, but, as always, by how long? — six months, a decade — who can tell?

Nigel — Have you seen evidence for post-war production of Rainbow?   You suggested 1950s.   How about the late 1940s?   I recall Adam telling us that in the late '40s Sowerby could sell everything they made;  in fact they had trouble keeping up with the demand.   Was there a similar boom further south?

By feature I meant a de-luxe re-shaped base, with all trace of a pontil scar completely gone.   I have actually displayed such items upside down on my stand as the bases are so superb.   Have you any idea of the S&W/RB name for this finish?   Was it an optional extra, or did they just do it automatically for their classiest clients?

Bernard C.  8)   
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Frank

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Re: Stevens and Williams or what...........
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2007, 12:26:31 PM »
...in the late '40s Sowerby could sell everything they made;  in fact they had trouble keeping up with the demand.   Was there a similar boom further south?

The following PG editorial hints at the issues creating the 'boom', seemingly more to do with inefficiencies and bureaucratic interference. Text courtesy glass-study.com .

Quote
NEW YEAR GREETINGS

To all our friends in the pottery and glass trades, whether they be manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, engineers, transfer or colour makers, we send best wishes for a successful and prosperous New Year. May 1950 be a year of continued full employment, though less harassed by the difficulties of 1949.

It may be that many of the problems prevalent in 1949 will remain in 1950. It had been hoped (in some quarters it had even been prophesied) that before the old year was out some of the restrictions on the home market would have been relaxed. But it was not to be. Exhortations to export more and more came regularly from the Board of Trade and the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Devaluation brought renewed and inten­sified demands. Generally speaking, potters and glassmakers responded loyally to the call, while the great majority of retailers, with admirable and patient fortitude, sighed, shrugged their shoulders and prepared themselves for yet another period of trading with drab-looking shelves and showcases. They have had to put up with much. They sometimes grumble, but they undoubtedly understand.

The prospects for 1950 are not easy to assess. Mr. Harold Wilson's report on his return from his American trip does not indicate any early relaxation of restrictions on the sale of decorated ware at home.

“BEEFS” FOR LUNCH

We have seen a circular which has apparently been distributed in this country by a Canadian contemporary, The Gift Buyer. It bears the droll title: “We Get Canadian 'Beefs' for Lunch.” With customary North American vigour, it tells of a speech made at a luncheon table by an anonymous Canadian distributor of pottery and glass, In effect, the circular hits at British pottery manu­facturers in general, and at an un-named one in particular.

When one has sorted the wheat from the chaff, it is found that the un-named British manufacturer will be eight months behind with his delivery schedule this month. The Gift Buyer remarks that the Canadian organisation is “fed-to-the-teeth with having to put up with what they consider to be 'Business Nonsense'.”

Adding fuel to the fire, the circular mentions a letter alleged to have been received from the British potter. We quote:

“Yesterday (October 31) he (the Canadian speaker) got a letter from the same factory (believe it or not!) which now tells him that the wares won't be here for Christmas, but if all goes well ('and you must understand the terrific difficulties the potteries are working under at this time ') the distributor will probably get his shipments some time in January.”

If the original intention was to circulate this story in Canada only, it seems a sure way of under­mining confidence in British pottery there, particularly when it opens with a reference to “Alien pottery, back stamped 'U.S. Occupied Territory'.” Canadian readers of this Journal are kept well informed of the true situation here in the British potteries. We are producing to capacity, and as more and more mechanisation is introduced production will rise in proportion. Agitation in the form of literature which pours scorn and imprecations on the hard-working pottery manufacturer and his operatives in Britain is not helpful. The speaker at the luncheon quoted should come to Britain and see the situation for himself. Potters would welcome the opportunity to show him round and if he turns up on the right day he may get real beef for lunch.
Frank A.
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Offline nigel benson

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Re: Stevens and Williams or what...........
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2007, 12:38:39 PM »
Hello,

Fair point Bernard, by putting 1950's, I was indicating that there was a progression between pre and post-war production that would have included a short period within the late 1940's. The evidence for this continuation of "Rainbow" ware was found by Jeanette Hayhurst some years ago and was particularly relevant if exhibiting at the NEC when it had a 1940 dateline for glass (it's currently 1950).

As for the pontil finishing. Since you have described the pontil as re-shaped I am assuming that you are referring to a wide, well polished, concave pontil that covers virtually the whole of the base?

There seems to be some consistancy as to the type of pontil that is used for a given series of wares, however, just as with other manufacturers, there are idiosyncracies that have, to date, not been explained. Your hypothosis that there may have been a particular finish for the more pricey items may well be right, but, since there have not been enough items placed together to give this credance, it is difficult to make any positive conclusion.

For instance, I have just bought a Keith Murray designed decanter by Royal Brierley that has a flat base. It is likely that this would have been an expensive item, but it doesn't have the 'deluxe'/ re-shaped pontil that you refer to. Most likely this would be because the flat base was more apt for the item in question.

The same variations between standard pontil, wide pontil, concave pontil covering the base, and flat base, occur across cut glass by S&W/RB. Standard and wide pontils occur within the art glass ranges, with occasional use of the style I have assumed you are referring to, which cover most of the base. Perhaps, at this stage, it is unwise to make any hard and fast 'rule(s)-of-thumb' concerning the finishing of S&W/RB's work, rather take note that a number of finishes were employed - making it a joy (or a chore) to diagnose!!

Nigel



Offline Bernard C

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Re: Stevens and Williams or what...........
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2011, 05:12:00 PM »
See topic Stevens & Williams Vase? for further discussion and images of several types of the S&W/RB Rainbow range, including both horizontally and vertically (ribbed) optic moulded examples.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline flying free

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Re: Stevens and Williams or what...........
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2012, 05:58:22 PM »
Did Stevens and Williams do a rainbow effect vase with bubbles please?
many thanks
m

 

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