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Author Topic: Oily glass - again!  (Read 2915 times)

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Offline selina

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Re: Oily glass - again!
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2007, 01:18:28 AM »
Hi all,

I found this topic interesting and scary. Having noticed a 'wet' feeling to some of my glass at times. I gather this is the same oily feeling being referred to. So essentially Im damaging my glass...but what to do?

My glass is in 2 big wood and glass cabinets...sitting on wooden shelves..

Is there a preventative for this happening...? Besides switching cabinets which I cant afford?

Selina
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Offline taylog1

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Re: Oily glass - again!
« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2007, 05:39:03 AM »
As moisture seems to be a prerequisite, you could try one of those moisture traps in the cabinet - only a guess though.


Offline Frank

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Re: Oily glass - again!
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2007, 08:55:53 AM »
It is a vicious circle, keeping the glass in a cabinet keeps it clean and safe but at risk of decay - keep it in open air and it gets dirty and is at greater risk of accidental damage.

In general this does not seem to be a destructive problem in the short term. A dry atmosphere is helpful but very difficult to achieve for most people, all glass cabinets may seem to be a solution, but what about the polutants released from the silica used to join the pieces. My own glass cabinets are a shop display cube system in which panels of glass clip together without glue. It has the advantage of free air flow and unlimited builkding combinations... downside, the dust gets in as easily as in the open!

Also some of the reactions desribed in the various references have a time factor, so not too irregular cleanings will tend to prevent the chemical reactions that cause additional damage.

When mentioning pieces of glass with these problems, please indicate colour and origin if known - it might lead to a deeper understanding.
Frank A.
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Offline Ivo

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Re: Oily glass - again!
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2007, 12:39:26 PM »
problems, please indicate colour and origin if known -

Orange glass is particularly vulnerable, I noticed.
Ivo
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Offline Tom B

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Re: Oily glass - again!
« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2007, 02:21:04 PM »
We all try to figure out what we are doing wrong when our glass "sweats.' 

IT'S NOT OUR FAULT.

It's caused by the glass manufacturers putting too much soda ash in the glass. For them, this allows the glass to be worked longer and cooler, (costs less for fuel, costs less for imperfect work). For us it means that eventually our prized pieces will no longer be pristine. 

There doesn't seem to be any way to keep this from happening, a friend of mine had a very special Gentile weight that separated horizontally after years of 'perspiring.'


Offline Frank

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Re: Oily glass - again!
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2007, 03:18:44 PM »
IT'S NOT OUR FAULT.

Except, of course, we can contribute by not taking care of glas that requires an external catalyst to promote the problem. But we are covering two different causes in this case and we can't always blame the glassmaker for lack of knowledge on the technology and in some cases lack of the technology.
Frank A.
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Offline 2025dave

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Re: Oily glass - again!
« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2007, 03:46:37 PM »
Other than a new cabinet I see moisture traps were mentioned as a possible cure .

The packets of crystals used to package with cameras for example would be ideal for this , if you have a few of them to swap over they can be dried with heat and reused , I'd imagine that these would be easy enough to conceal below shelves with tape for example .

Just a thought in what is a fascinating yet scary topic !

Dave.
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Offline pamela

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Re: Oily glass - again!
« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2007, 05:25:52 PM »
Hi Dave et al.
Armin and me are back - this is my first post.
silicagel - Dave?
Pamela
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Offline Cathy B

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Re: Oily glass - again!
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2007, 01:16:48 AM »
Welcome back Pamela! We missed you! (Does that translate well?)


 

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