Author Topic: Books on Paperweight Canes  (Read 2527 times)

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Offline glasstrufflehunter

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2007, 05:48:26 AM »
So there are no books of more recent date that would identify canes in modern weights?

I think one showing Italian canes would be very useful with all of the Chinese knock-offs floating around these days.
I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog


Offline KevinH

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2007, 08:24:33 PM »
I think my list shown at the start of this thread is all that I am aware of in standard book form.

But there is occasionally extra information in individual articles within club publications such as the Bulletin of the Paperweight Collectors Association, Inc. and in more recent years the Newsletters of the Paperweight Collectors Circle. PCA Bulletins can be found through dealers - for example Sweetbriar Gallery have a good range for sale.

As for something covering Murano canes, the only publications I know of are two books by Giovanni Sarpellon (the later contains a lot of the same detail as the first). However, they cover 19th century murrhine and silhouettes of such as Bussolin and Franchini and there is nothing on 20th century canes.

It is not just the Chinese similarities that cause confusion. Murano canes are sold around the world and several modern makers include (or have included) them in their work. Producing a book on the subject would be a monumental task!

KevinH


Offline karelm

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2007, 08:42:13 PM »
WHOA!!!!
Quote
Murano canes are sold around the world and several modern makers include (or have included) them in their work.
Ok if I understand what KevH is saying here is that I can actually buy a set of canes, make a weight or two (in the process get a lot of blisters) and have a "Murano" weight? ??? (...and given what happens around the world a nice little sticker can't be to difficult to print)
Does this mean that a lot of my learning should be around style and form, and not around the canes themselves?
KarelM
Ps I think that last question is rhetorical(sp??)
Karel
"Holy cows make the best steaks"


Offline KevinH

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2007, 10:40:38 PM »
1. What you would have is a weight that contains Murano canes. But it is only deceit that turns it into a "Murano weight".

2. Yes, a sticker stating "Murano" could be made (and they are already available - real or not).

3. The question about not focusing on just canes is very pertinent. It is always best to examine all aspects of any item before deciding on its likely place of manufacture. But cane details always have a good story to tell and are, in my view, one of the most important aspects for attempting to identify an unsigned / unlabelled weight.

However, we should put all this in context. Canes have, since they were first made, been used by other makers. For example, canes by Bussolin (1830s Murano) were used by Pietro Bigaglia (the person usually credited with making the first of what we now call a glass paperweight). In more recent times, cane making has been "outsourced" by companies who did not have the resources or skills to make canes themsleves. And in the years between, around the world, all sorts of exchanges of canes have been made.
KevinH


Offline Glassic

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2007, 11:05:07 PM »
Thanks, I've had it a long time and bought it because it was there, and not for the paperweights! ::)
The canes are easily bought, most mosaic supply places have them. This site has a number of illustrations of what's commonly available.
http://www.ec-securehost.com/smalti.com/Millefiori.html
Given a kiln I could come up with something ugly!
 


Offline karelm

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2007, 12:24:50 AM »
This is getting a bit off topic but I have just found that http://www.paperweights.com/perthshire.htm even has Perthshire canes, or at least bits of, them for sale!
Anyone intrested in making a 2007 Perthshire "end of day" >:D
Karel
"Holy cows make the best steaks"


Offline glasstrufflehunter

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2007, 07:18:19 AM »
I have a paperweight that is by glass eye that has a scattering of Italian canes.

Here's a question: I've always thought the canes in Gentile weights looked Italian. Are they, or did they make their own?
I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog


 

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