Author Topic: Books on Paperweight Canes  (Read 2558 times)

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Offline KevinH

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Books on Paperweight Canes
« on: April 19, 2005, 05:16:08 PM »
Edited, 25 April 2005 - My reference to the Paul Hollister Jr. book being probably the first to include details for cane types was incorrect. I had forgotten about the 1968 work by Patricia K McCawley which is now added to the list below.
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In another message, a question was raised about any books on paperweight canes. As with much of the art glass, books on paperweights have not tended to concentrate on specific details such as cane identities.

But there is more interest in this now, particularly within internal club publications such as the UK-based PCC Newsletter and the US PCA Annual Bulletin. With the continued research, authors are beginning to include much more on cane details. However, as yet there is no one book that covers a full range of canes for various makers from the many countries.

For now, the following list covers books that I consider useful for cane considerations:

Patrica K McCawley - Antique Glass Paperweights from France, 1968.
Probably the first book to include illustrative details for cane types within maker.

Paul Hollister Jr. - The Encyclopedia of Glass Paperweights, 1969.
An excellent reference work that includes line drawings of cane details.

George N. Kulles - Identifying Antique Paperweights Millefiori, 1985.
Mostly illustrative sketches but very well drawn and organised.

George N. Kulles - Identifying Antique Paperweights Lampwork, 1987.
Same style and content as the Millefiori book, but concentrating on Flowers, Fruit, Petals and so forth.

Giovanni Sarpellon - Miniature Masterpieces, Mosaic Glass 1838-1924. 1995.
Excellent reference for a variety of standard millefiori canes and mosaic "picture" canes. Covers Franchini family, Moretti family and Barovier family

John D. Hawley - The Art of the Paperweight, The Boston & Sandwhcih and New England Glass Companies, 1997.
Focusing on the two main American 19th century paperweight makers, colour illustrations of many canes are given, with many more clearly seen in photos of actual weights.

Andrew H. Dohan - The Dictionary of Paperweight Signature Canes, Identification and Dating, 1997.
This book does not identify general canes but is invaluable for confirming a maker where, for example, a simple "B" or "H" or "P" cane is seen but the weight is otherwise unidentified.

Marek Kordasiewicz - Glass Paperweights, The Heritage of the 19th Century Riesengebirge and Isengebirge Glassworks, 2002.
In Polish and English, this book has full colour illustrations throughout. Individual actual canes are shown as well as large images of full weights allowing the canes to be seen clearly.

George N. Kulles - Identifying Antique Paperweights The Less Familiar, 2002.
Again, same style as the other two, but with more colour illustrations. Covers later findings on some of the regular companies but also adds details for the likes of Bacchus, Gillender, St. Mandé, Russia and Venice.

Many of these books can only be obtained through dealers and perhaps Amazon (etc) or even occasionally through eBay.

Of course, for Ysart canes, although not published in print form, my own web pages are available for all to browse at any time: http://www.btinternet.com/~kevh.glass/
KevinH


Offline KevinH

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Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2005, 03:45:55 PM »
See edited note in original message.
KevinH


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Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2005, 04:48:55 PM »
Kevin, if I was only going to buy one, which one would you recommend?  :?

(Or which two, if you felt it was essential  :roll: )

Leni


Offline KevinH

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Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2005, 10:51:13 PM »
Leni,

If you can find a copy, go for: Paul Hollister Jr. - The Encyclopedia of Glass Paperweights, 1969. That will provide a wealth of information as well as basic info on the cane patterns.

Unfortunately, without a specialised book on "canes from all over the place" it's generally a case of adding as many of the others as you can find them and afford to buy them.

But I would also recommend the the Kulles books - they are not expensive and do have a lot of useful details, even if I personally find fault with parts of them. And, since I get a feeling that you may have an eye for Reisengebirge (etc.), Marek Kordasiewicz's book is excellent.

Check out the Sweetbriar Gallery website - they have copies of lots of books (but currently no copy of the Hollister Jr. one).
KevinH


Offline Leni

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Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2005, 08:27:51 AM »
Thanks Kevin, I have ordered a used copy of the Hollister from Amazon and asked Sweetbriar if I can collect a Kulles at the National on May 8th   :D

I'll try to get the Kordasiewicz next!   :roll:

Many thanks again   :D

Leni
Leni

Offline karelm

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2007, 09:24:28 AM »
Whilst looking for some information on what book would be a good place to start I came across this old thread.  Does KevH and the other contributers still stand by this or are there newer or "better" books on the market now?  I am looking to buy a general reference book suitable for a beginner that will help with general identification, even if just pointing one in the right direction.
I have had a look at Paperweights by Sibylle Jargstorf (http://crunruh.zoovy.com/product/0887403751) and it does look ok.
Any suggestions of other books or to paraphrase a question asked earlier in this thread, if you where to buy only one book whta and why would you buy?
Kind regards,
KarelM

Karel
"Holy cows make the best steaks"

Offline KevinH

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2007, 12:55:38 PM »
1. Newer and better books?
In the context of my list above, I know of no newer books covering paperweight cane details.

2. For a starter book, covering almost all areas of paperweight collecting:

Pat Reilly, Paperweights: The Collector's Guide to Selecting and Enjoying New and Antique Paperweights (Collectors Guide Series) This title is a 1999 softback version of Pat's original, 1994, hardcover version with the slightly different full title, "Paperweights: The Collector's Guide to Identifying, Selecting, and Enjoying New and Vintage Paperweights"

This is an inexpensive book but extremely well written with lots of good photos.
KevinH

Offline Glassic

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2007, 03:12:26 PM »
Did E.M. Elville have anything of value to say in Paperweights and other Glass Curiosities?
 
 

Offline KevinH

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2007, 03:46:14 PM »
Yes.  ;D
KevinH

Offline KevinH

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Re: Books on Paperweight Canes
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2007, 04:13:03 PM »
But being a little more helpful (now that I have located my copy of the Elville book) ...

Although there is almost nothing said about cane details in the way that I like to discuss them (!), there is a good amount of information on desirability, rarity, and general prices achieved for weights as at 1954. Paperweigts are covered in the first 48 pages, with the remaining 64 dealing with the other curiosities - and in this context, "curiosity" was used with its earlier meaning of "fascinating, interesting, etc." rather than the more modern meaning of "odd, strange etc.".

As with any of the older books, there are parts that now clearly show as "errors" but at the time were simply the accepted knowledge. Also, there are some views expressed which I might disagree with - such as on page 29 where it is said of some St Louis millefiori weights, "Prices vary considerably ... but are not at all influenced by the figures [i.e. silhouettes] or by the initials and dates [i.e. signature canes]". A previous owner of my copy annotated that sentnce with the simple comment, "Nonsense". But perhaps in 1954, Elville's view was indeed the accepted view of collectors and it's only in later years that us "newcomers" have a revised idea of things.
KevinH

 

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