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Author Topic: Plate Etched  (Read 1106 times)

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Offline paradisetrader

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Plate Etched
« on: April 30, 2007, 09:43:09 AM »
The americans have a term "Plate etched" or "plate etching".
We seem not to use it here. (Zero hits on Ebay UK for the term)
Does anyone know what we call it ?

Here is a more recent (1960's ?)  example :
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/_W0QQitemZ170103665904
but I believe that the technique goes back to at least 1910

Does anyone know what the technique involves in practical terms ?

Presumably it was introduced to cut costs. Is it therefore regarded as a negative among collectors ?
Thanks
Pete


Offline pamela

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Re: Plate Etched
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2007, 08:58:54 PM »
Hi Pete,
'plate etched' could it mean mould etched? This is what I have learnt so far: they did not etch the glass but the mould prior to pressing glass into it. The result is that plate etched is high on the surface of the glass, whereas etching the glass would result 'as engraving'
??? Just an idea that sount correct...
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 1914)


Offline Frank

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Re: Plate Etched
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2007, 09:26:28 PM »
We just call it transfer printing. But it could be that this is a variant that uses a metal plate with a raised design that is used to cut through a wax coating on the glass prior to etching. There are probably various names for the subtly different ways of mechanising etched designs. (Update: The metal plate was used to transfer the design to another 'flexible' transfer medium and not directly to the glass... which made no sense.)

The use of an actual printed transfer in which the ink is also the etchant tended to be cheaper but what the individual costings of the different methods I have no idea. Unfortunately most of the patents have useful titles like "An improved method of transferring etched designs".

Hajdamach gives a good overview of the early history of the techniques but does not pretend to be comprehensive, most of the other accounts I have read have been related to substantially later methods. I hope to find some more buried in my library but that is not possible right now!
Frank A.
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Sklounion

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Re: Plate Etched
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2007, 09:49:43 PM »
Clearly what is needed is a uniform set of terms.
Etching, should really refer to the removal of base material using chemical media, as in acid etching.
Plate etching is what exactly? etching using a template, engraving using a template?? Application of a transfer?
Obviously, a need for more rigorous definitions, of frequently, and I suspect erroneously, applied terms.
Regards,
Marcus


Offline pamela

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Re: Plate Etched
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2007, 10:14:28 PM »
thank you so much Marcus for this! Etching removes, and if you etch the mould, the pattern will be high on the surface as it seems in this item Pete has submitted?
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 1914)


Offline Frank

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Re: Plate Etched
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2007, 10:22:55 PM »
I assumed the etching was by acid. The plate is used to reproduce the image.

The problem is there are so many different ways it was done and all with their own vocabulary  :P
Frank A.
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Offline pamela

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Re: Plate Etched
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2007, 10:31:32 PM »
Hi Frank, why not etch a mould by acid?
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 1914)


Offline Sid

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Re: Plate Etched
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2007, 01:14:10 AM »
Hello:

From the National Heisey Glass Museum webpage:

"Plate etching is produced by engraving a design onto a metal plate. The plate is inked, then the ink is transferred to a paper made especially for etching. This paper print is fitted to the article to be etched and the ink is firmly pressed against the glass. When the ink is transferred onto the glass, the paper is removed. Except where the design is to be etched, the glass is covered with beeswax. The glassware is then submerged in acid, which eats the exposed glass. After the wax is washed off in hot water, a silver-gray plate etching results."

http://www.heiseymuseum.org/resources/glasstypes.htm

Hajdamach describes this technique on page 197 but calls it the "transfer print resist method" instead of the term plate etching which is widely used in North America.


Sklounion

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Re: Plate Etched
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2007, 06:24:47 AM »
Thank you for the clarification, Sid.
Regards,
Marcus


Offline paradisetrader

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Re: Plate Etched
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2008, 06:24:23 PM »
For the record this is the item which lead me to investigate this technique.
Pete

 

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