Author Topic: contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...  (Read 6198 times)

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Offline Angela B

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Marbles
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2004, 05:02:12 AM »
There's a page of books about Marbles at http://www.book-seek.com/marblebooks.html
- and there are some great books about marbles.
All the best
Angela
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CerianB

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Re: .
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2004, 10:18:58 PM »
Quote from: "Mike E etc"

   Ivo, I am a wanna be paperweight maker!
 
I *am* a paperweight maker!  Well, I've made one, ok?  

I've been a Collector for just about a year now and when I spotted a reasonably local glass studio offering a "have-a-go" session, I jumped at the chance.  Didn't get to do the glass gathering but wow! what a buzz I got for that hour with hot glass.  Fantastic  :D


Offline Mike E etc

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contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2004, 08:24:43 AM »
Cerian,
 that is cool when a collector gets to try there hand at hot glass, it gives one a new perspective. Here is a link to a few of the 3/4" paperweights I have made in the past; http://www.glassartists.org/Gal116_paperweights.asp



Mike E


guest in seattle

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great site for handcrafted marbles
« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2004, 04:32:15 AM »
I enjoyed the discussion on marbles as a collectible artform.  Recently I found some incredible glass marbles at an artshow and just received note from the Seattle artist Todd Martin, that he launched his website a few weeks ago.  

www.toddmartinglass.com

I highly recommend this site.  It is beautifully done, complimenting his amazing work.

Something to keep in mind is that not all marbles are made the same way.
Serious collectors know that inferior/most artists break off the punty in the flame and then buff out the rough spot.  I believe that the more valuable collectable is one that has been completely crafted IN THE FLAME, as Martin's are.  He explained to me at his artshow that he does no buffing, but instead works with a smaller and smaller punty and in the end lets the flame itself smooth out the rough spot. This is something I hadn't known before and now that I am inquiring with other glass artists, I am finding that Martin is rare.  His work is just beautiful.  

If you haven't explored his site, I urge you to visit it.  He also makes pendants, bracelets, large sculptural pieces combining glass and bronze, as well as his own unique solid glass wine stoppers.  I got some wine stoppers and a glass cork pull (he doesn't have those on the site, but you can buy them if you go to one of his art shows) for a friend's wedding and it was their favorite gift.

Happy collecting.  And yes, marbles are very collectible.

Seattle glass collector


Offline Bernard C

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contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2005, 12:37:49 AM »
I see that our moderator has moved this topic to the Paperweights forum.   A most sensible course of action as marbles and paperweights seem to me to have much in common, and are easily distinguished from other types of glass without specialist knowledge.

Sadly, the MK Shopping Centre Fair is no longer.   The finances did not add up any more.   So my main outlet for packs of old marbles has disappeared.   I am still buying them;  in fact I bought a sweet jar two-thirds full of marbles recently at a local auction.

I might try them at a glass fair — some glass collectors must have children or grandchildren of a suitable age for marble games.

Anyone have any useful ideas or suggestions?   My problem is that my margins are not large enough to be able to sell them wholesale, and I cannot justify expensive table-top space at antique fairs to them.   It's a help yourself from the box-on-the-floor approach, a million miles away from modern art glass marbles.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline glasswizard

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contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2005, 09:49:43 AM »
My favorite artist is Josh Simpson. I have a nice collection of contemporary paperweights, but the reality is I cannot afford Josh Simpson paperweights. His marbles that I own are from the Inhabited Planet series and to me are a great represenation of his work.

To view his work, here is the link to his website  http://www.joshsimpson.com/site/index.html


These are the three Inhabited Planets I feel very lucky to possess.
http://tinypic.com/2i8e20


Offline chopin-liszt

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contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2005, 09:50:44 PM »
:D Well, now I definitely have an excuse to browse the paperweight forum! I do like marbles, have been watching a few on eBay in the states, with a view perhaps to starting on them. I'm still not keen on paperweights though :twisted: Cheers, Sue
Cheers, Sue (M)

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Offline Leni

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contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2005, 09:57:01 PM »
Quote from: "chopin-liszt"
I do like marbles .... I'm still not keen on paperweights though :twisted: Cheers, Sue

 :shock:  :shock:  :shock:
Big marbles, small paperweights.  Small paperweights, big marbles!  :?  :roll:

Leni
Leni


Offline chopin-liszt

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contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2005, 10:01:57 PM »
:roll: Obviously I just like my paperweights in the round! :roll:
TTFN, Sue
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.


Offline aa

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Re: great site for handcrafted marbles
« Reply #19 on: March 30, 2005, 10:20:12 PM »
Quote from: "guest in seattle"


www.toddmartinglass.com

Something to keep in mind is that not all marbles are made the same way.
Serious collectors know that inferior/most artists break off the punty in the flame and then buff out the rough spot.  I believe that the more valuable collectable is one that has been completely crafted IN THE FLAME, as Martin's are.  He explained to me at his artshow that he does no buffing, but instead works with a smaller and smaller punty and in the end lets the flame itself smooth out the rough spot. This is something I hadn't known before and now that I am inquiring with other glass artists, I am finding that Martin is rare.  His work is just beautiful.  Seattle glass collector


Quote from: "glasswizard"
His marbles that I own are from the Inhabited Planet series and to me are a great represenation of his work.

To view his work, here is the link to his website  http://www.joshsimpson.com/site/index.html



Harvey Littleton's immortal words: "technique is cheap".
Let's keep things in perspective - Todd is a lampworker, working over a flame and Josh is a blower working from a furnace. These are completely different disciplines and each would choose whether flame finishing is feasible or not. It is probably easier for a lampworker to flame finish, but cold working and polishing is time consuming and skilled and should not diminish the finished piece. The really important thing is the actual appearance and content of the piece.
Hello & Welcome to the Board! Sometimes my replies are short & succinct, other times lengthy. Apologies in advance if they are not to your satisfaction; my main concern is to be accurate for posterity & to share my limited knowledge
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