No-one likes general adverts, and ours hadn't been updated for ages, so we're having a clear-out and a change round to make the new ones useful to you. These new adverts bring in a small amount to help pay for the board and keep it free for you to use, so please do use them whenever you can, Let our links help you find great books on glass or a new piece for your collection. Thank you for supporting the Board.

Having the right books is a great aid in identifying glass.
To help you find the most useful books we have put together "book-seek.com"
Why not take a look on book-seek.com

Author Topic: contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...  (Read 7266 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Anonymous

  • Guest
contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2005, 08:28:54 PM »
:twisted:  The real reason I like marbles is that they're not small paperweights, they're beads without holes, and I collected glass beads before I started on other glass :wink: TTFN, Sue.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Offline chopin-liszt

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 9934
    • Scotland
contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #21 on: April 01, 2005, 10:37:33 AM »
:shock: That last bit was me. I seem to need to log in twice before I'm accepted, and it's not just for the paperweight bit either! :? TTFN, Sue
Cheers, Sue (M)

“Empirical evidence on expert opinion shows that it is extremely unreliable”
Ioannidis, (2005), Plos Medicine.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Offline Hourglass

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 85
Re: contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2009, 01:17:02 PM »
Just been reading through the posts on the marble side of glass and yes, they are collectable, or at least here they are as I've mentioned before, the Teign Valley Glass works, museum, House Of Marbles is just down the road and they do have millions of them in varying forms and sizes. Haven't seen them being made as yet but the larger ones, 25mm and 50mm ones are done on a rolling machine and come off with striation lines on them which to me makes them look cheap but if you pick them over you can find very smooth ones. Old marbles around here are plentiful and fairly cheap, I bought 215 in a cardboard box at a boot sale this morning for £6 and these were the old traditional ones in sizes and varying colour inclusions from 15mm to 30mm and all between. I will certainly be looking for more and from time to time I still keep turning up the odd marble when working in my garden.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9396
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
Re: contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2009, 01:53:15 AM »
Test of a good marble has to be its rolling game play qualities. Would love to play with artists made marbles. Sensible marble play would cause little if any damage, it was the jangling in the pocket that mucked them up.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Offline Hourglass

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 85
Re: contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #24 on: November 25, 2009, 09:50:27 AM »
I think it's the 'rolling quality' or the lack of it that makes marbles more interesting and when playing with them makes the 'game' more interesting. Old marbles tend to have slight irregularities in shape and most are not perfectly round and when playing with or rolling them on a level smooth surface they tend to deviate from the line which used to, in my memory, made playing with them more interesting and needed a certain level of skill. It is surprising how tough marbles are and how hard they can come in contact with another or other object before they will incur any damage, they will of course chip, flake or split if they have a flaw in them or are 'shot' with the velocity of a bullet. It's quite difficult to find genuine old marbles from the 1900's now as the traditional type is still being produced and are difficult to identify apart from obvious wear, colour inclusions and patterns and other things like small internal air bubbles. Perhaps someone knows a definitive way to identify older marbles? You see a lot being offered on eBay as 'vintage' marbles but most actually turn out to be quite modern and new.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Offline glasstrufflehunter

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 584
    • My Yahoo 360 page & Paperweight Blog
Re: contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2009, 05:41:17 AM »
Most of the 'marbles' I have are of stone though I do have a sizable one made of blue aventurine. I have a couple inexpensive chinese millefiori as well. I hve yet to add any of the more serious studio artists.

I did have something funny happen one year I had my paperweights displayed on a rack that was visible through the window. Many were of a spherical shape. One day a neighbor kid spotted them. His eyes went round. "Those are some huuuge marbles!"
I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Offline Hourglass

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 85
Re: contemporary marbles & your feelings about them as a...
« Reply #26 on: October 08, 2010, 06:39:49 PM »
This topic seems to have been neglected of late. Marbles here in the UK seem to have been overlooked in the past but are now becoming recognised in their own right especially now several art glass manufacturers are producing 'collectable' marbles. Below is one that I recently purchased which I believe by it's pontil and other forming marks to be Victorian an inch in diameter. Below this one are a group of new 1"1/2 marbles which are being produced by TVG (Teign Valley Glass) which is very local to me. The far right and far left ones on the top row look slightly 'squat' but this is an optical illusion as they are all perfectly spherical. I will attempt to photograph these better sometime to do them the justice they deserve.


Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


 

Look for glass on
 ebay.co.uk 
Look for glass on
 eBay.com (US)

Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum


This Website is provided by Angela Bowey, PO Box 113, Paihia 0247, New Zealand