Author Topic: Et tu, Kastrup...  (Read 1617 times)

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Offline Pinkspoons

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Et tu, Kastrup...
« on: May 28, 2007, 11:03:49 AM »
I'm not usually a fan of transfer-printed glass, I have to admit - but I do really like the subtly of this vase:


It's a really intense sapphire blue when viewed from certain angles, and a nice pale aqua blue view viewed from straight on, overlaid with a blue-grey transfer that emulates an etched pattern. It's by Kastrup, c.1960. I suspect it's a JE Bang design, but I've yet to look into it. It's the only transfer-decorated glass I've seen by the factory that isn't drinksware.

Just thought I'd share it.  ;D


Offline David E

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Re: Et tu, Kastrup...
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2007, 05:40:27 PM »
Thanks Nic! Hey, credibility ;D

I assume this was silk-screen printed rather than transfer, but I wonder if they were influenced by other makers? Must have been produced in the wake of Chance's initial range.
David
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Offline Pinkspoons

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Re: Et tu, Kastrup...
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2007, 06:00:16 PM »
Sorry, I meant screen-printed!

I'm not sure if there were any other Scandinavian glassworks producing printed decorative glass at this time - or since, except for some nasty wall-plates Holmegaard produced in the early 1970s. So it may indeed be possible that they took their lead from Chance. I'll have to hunt out the correct date for the design. I don't imagine that it would be any later than 1960.

I have been wondering if it was an economic choice rather than an aesthetic one. In terms of decorative glass Kastrup was rather seen as the poor relation next to the other major Scandinavian glassworks, so I'm not sure if emulating an etched effect with printing was simply cheaper than actual etching?


Offline Frank

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Re: Et tu, Kastrup...
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2007, 07:41:11 PM »
.... so I'm not sure if emulating an etched effect with printing was simply cheaper than actual etching?

Cheaper, lower training, safer.
Frank A.
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Offline David E

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Re: Et tu, Kastrup...
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2007, 07:52:04 PM »
Probably much quicker as well. BTW, there was a range of transfer-printed slumped glass from a Scandinavian company, but I'll need to check back to see who it was.
David
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Offline David E

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Re: Et tu, Kastrup...
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2007, 08:02:39 PM »
Riihimäen Lasi, as found by Robbo:

http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,7295.msg61688.html#msg61688

Sadly the photos did not survive...
David
► The Curious History of the Bulb Vase ◄
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Offline Pinkspoons

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Re: Et tu, Kastrup...
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2007, 08:17:45 PM »
Oh, I do vaguely remember that thread - but I don't recall what the glass looked like.


Offline David E

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Re: Et tu, Kastrup...
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2007, 09:01:28 AM »
The shapes were pretty standard, as I recall (with difficulty) but I'm struggling to remember the designs.

Did anyone personally archive them?
David
► The Curious History of the Bulb Vase ◄
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Offline robbo

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Re: Et tu, Kastrup...
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2007, 06:59:24 AM »
As far I remember, they where all small square / rectangular ashtray size pieces. One had the Riihimäen Lynx logo and the others, I think, had transfers of line drawings of buildings. At least one was a hotel.

I may have archived the images on my hard drive. Now just to find them...  ::)

robbo
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Offline David E

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Re: Et tu, Kastrup...
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2007, 09:35:48 PM »
Thanks Robbo! Can't think why I didn't keep the photos for my own records... tsk...! ::)

I seem to remember one had a red cross-hatch line design and I was considering a bid on that if I could understand the listing! I'll contact Ingela next time :D

I would be grateful if anyone does spot any other examples. I have started to collect unknown (or rather; definitely non-Chance) glass trays - there are a surprising number about... :o ;D
David
► The Curious History of the Bulb Vase ◄
 A new book by Patricia Coccoris

Contact ► Cortex Design ◄ to order any book

 

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