Author Topic: Is this WF 9858 ?  (Read 1866 times)

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Offline Bernard C

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Re: Is this WF 9858 ?
« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2007, 07:35:43 AM »
Correction — There are three plates in Hajdamach that could be relevant to 5-sided bowls and vases.   These are
  • Plate 272 — Skeleton mould
  • Plate 276 — A vertical metal plates cutter, here used as a crimping former
  • Plate 279 — The Fenton photograph of a rim being crimped

Also what does FLC mean?

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Chris Harrison

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Re: Is this WF 9858 ?
« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2007, 07:59:33 AM »
Hi Bernard
Sorry to be obtuse. I forgot where I was.
It's Whitefriars-ese shorthand for Full Lead Crystal (to denote completely self-coloured items, rather than clear-cased)


Offline Chris Harrison

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Re: Is this WF 9858 ?
« Reply #12 on: June 06, 2007, 08:29:31 AM »
I don't see why they couldn't have made use of the five-lobed mould that was originally used to make the 9090.

Blow into the mould, swing the bubble out to stretch it, then finish off the neck by hand.  Seems reasonable to me.

Maybe one of the old WF gang can tell us for certain.


Offline Quackers

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Re: Is this WF 9858 ?
« Reply #13 on: June 06, 2007, 06:34:28 PM »
Thinking about the possible re-use of an old five-lobed mould, does anyone know if there were old 3- or 8-lobed bowls/vases?  I'm thinking about the 9570 tricorn and 9728 8-sided vase.  My interest in WF is primarily late 1950s onwards so I'm not that familiar with the earlier stuff. 

Bernard - I often see reference to the Hajdamach book but I know nothing else about it - do you mean this? http://www.amazon.co.uk/British-Glass-1800-1914-Charles-Hajdamach/dp/1851491414/ref=sr_1_2/026-8196428-9118004?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1181154478&sr=1-2
Is it worth getting for general glass info or shall I stick with the specific factory/type/area books that I've been buying?
Tim

I started with Carnival glass, then other C20 irridescent, then Whitefriars ducks, then Dartington FT Daisies etc, then Whitefriars Tricorns...when will it end?


Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Is this WF 9858 ?
« Reply #14 on: June 06, 2007, 06:53:50 PM »
Yep, that's the book, but if you buy it get it from amazon.com for about the same number of dollars as pounds. Delivery is pretty quick if in stock. I've only just started reading mine so no opinions yet on worthwhileness


Offline Chris Harrison

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Re: Is this WF 9858 ?
« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2007, 09:42:28 PM »
Tim,
If I remember rightly, Barbara (BJB) sold an smallish 8-lobed sapphire bubble bowl last year some time.  She was doubtful as to whether it was a Whitefriars piece, but it went - to the NL, I seem to recall.


Offline Bernard C

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Re: Is this WF 9858 ?
« Reply #16 on: June 06, 2007, 11:54:18 PM »
Quote from: Chris Harrison
... the five-lobed mould that was originally used to make the 9090. ...

Chris — What type of mould was it?
  • Five vertical rods set into a base plate
  • Five angled rods set into a base plate
  • A one-piece dip mould
  • A five vertical metal plates "cutting" mould
  • A metal multi-section opening mould
  • A wooden steam-lubricated multi-section opening mould
  • Something else I've not thought of

You have no idea of what great pleasure it is to find a rare WF enthusiast prepared to talk production techniques.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Chris Harrison

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Re: Is this WF 9858 ?
« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2007, 07:17:05 AM »
Bernard,
I think we're talking about a dip mould, here.
I had a brief technical chat with Patrick Hogan, Ray Annenberg, Eddie King and Nashie at the Whitefriars Day at Aaronson Noon back in March, and one of them said that was the most commonly used mould for the kind of shape and finish being discussed here. 
Eddie had with him a diamond point mould that he uses to create bubbled pieces.  Patrick had helped recreate a tricorn mould so that Ray could show us how those vases were made.  It was all fascinating stuff.
I'm sure that one of the above could contribute more - or Adam, perhaps.  I'm just extrapolating from my very limited knowledge base (but I want to learn more...).


 

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