Author Topic: Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?  (Read 2548 times)

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Offline glasseyed

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Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?
« on: July 15, 2007, 08:30:27 PM »
Hi

Can anyone help me with an ID on this pretty but rather sad paperweight. It looks like someone had used it to hammer in carpet tacks ;D

The canes look to me like they might be Clichy, has anyone had a weight this sad polished?

Thanks

Hazel

http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/bridgesantiques/Paperweights



Offline karelm

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Re: Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2007, 02:21:17 PM »
I'm no expert on Clichy but they do look like rose canes on the outside.
In terms of restoration have a look at this picture:
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-7890

Title:Collectors' Paperweights price guide and catalogue
Author: Lawrence H. Selman
Publisher: Paperweight Press, Santa Cruz, California
Copyright: 1986, L.H. Selman Ltd.
Page: 175

I dont have a scanner so took a picture out of one of my books.  It gives a sense of what a good restorer can do.
Restoration seems to depend on how much "free" glass there is as the restorer basically peels layers of glass off until the damge is removed.  IMHO I would not restore the base until I have seen what the top looks like if it is restored, the reason I say this is that the base does not play such a critical role in a millefiori weight as it does in a clear base lampwork weight, as I said MHO.
Kind regards,
KarelM
PS: Mods please have a look at the pic and description and decide if it is OK in terms of copyright.

Mod: citation included.
Karel
"Holy cows make the best steaks"


Offline Frank

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Re: Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2007, 06:16:45 PM »
Please add a full reference to the work, author, title, publisher, date of publication, page No, plate No. The copyright date and owner should also be kept with the image.

One of us will add the reference into your first posting later.

Thanks for asking!
Frank A.
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Offline glasseyed

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Re: Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2007, 07:23:00 PM »
Thanks Karel

The worst of the damage is in fact to the base so maybe it can be saved. I think it would be a pretty small weight if it polished sucessfully. :D

Regards

Hazel


Offline KevinH

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Re: Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2007, 12:53:33 PM »
I don't think this is a Clichy weight. The canes are not as evenly cut and set as I would expect for Clichy. More likely Bohemian or St Mandé.

But the photos do not show the canes too well. Any chance of better pics with close ups of the canes? If the camera has, say, a 5 megapixel rating and has a "close-up" or "macro" function, then a good sized image of a cane will be easily possible.

A tip for phtographing details when the glass is scratched is to immerese the weight in water so that the water just covers it, then take the photo.
KevinH


Offline alexander

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Re: Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2007, 01:04:32 PM »
Could it be from around Riesenbirge?
There are roses shown in the Jargsdorf book with white petals on the inside
and also a "star-like" cane on page 72. (only similar in concept, not identical in any way).

I would really like to see the centre canes too.
Alexander
Norwegian glass collector


Offline glasseyed

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Re: Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2007, 02:01:55 PM »
Hi

Thanks for the replys, I have had another go at the photographs with the weight underwater (great tip - thanks Kev).

http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/bridgesantiques/Paperweights02

Even in water the central cane was difficult to capture, I have not heard of Riesenbirge (more to learn :D).

Thanks

Hazel


Offline karelm

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Re: Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2007, 05:29:33 PM »
Hi,
Having looked at those new pics I agree with Kev that it is prob not Clichy due to the arrangement not being precise enough.
However I still think that the weight has loads of age to it and comes from some "good" factory.  Riesenbirge if I remember correctly was part of Bohemia and made wieghts late 1800's and I believe their weights are very scarce...dont take my word though!
Kind regards
Karel
"Holy cows make the best steaks"


Offline alexander

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Re: Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2007, 10:28:45 PM »
You should take my Riesenbirge mention with a grain of salt btw - it's too hard to tell from the pics.
Bohemia is my gut feeling and I'm leaning towards that region.

Seeing the new pictures my "star" theory goes out the window and they're not the same kind of stars at all.

The central cane looks intrigueing but it's hard to tell.
It appears to be 7 rods of 'light blue - white - pink white', circeling the middle
which appears to be pink star shape with white filling.

Page 75 in the Jargsdorf book has a similar cane in a Riesenbirge weight but it's all speculation without
a clear picture.

Alexander
Norwegian glass collector


Offline KevinH

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Re: Terrible condition but maybe Clichy?
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2007, 11:20:30 PM »
Thanks for the better pics, Hazel. I got the water tip from John Simmonds' book, Paperweights From Great Britain 1930-2000.

I will take a look at various literature for any cane matches but it may take me a while.

Alexander's thoughts about "Riesenbirge" could be reasonable but (and please forgive my pedanticism, folks) the place was actually Riesengebirge (with "ge" before the "birg"). This transaltes into English as Giant Mountains and was at the northern section of the former Bohemia.

Another thought is that the canes might find a match with what is now known to be "later Clichy" - but I don't think the quality of cane setting is good enough. Anyone with the Clichy book care to comment?
KevinH

 

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