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Author Topic: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please  (Read 2893 times)

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Offline billben

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Re: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please
« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2017, 10:18:55 PM »
I fully understand and agree with what you say....

I would in his defence say that he does make it clear  that the photos/identification should be used 'in conjunction' with the written work of his book in order to fully identify an item.

That doesnt mean that he didnt make mistakes but its suprising how many people look at a photograph and take it as gospel that if they have an item the same as that pictured, then it  must be as identified in the book, instead of double checking the written work to prove the point.  I would also add that an identifiction on an internet web site (commercial mainly but not specifically) is also no gurantee that the webowner got it right.

In the past 30 years I have noted that critisim of his mistakes is rarely given with any understanding and is usually quite harsh, I wonder how many of those who do critise at some time purchased an item based purely on the photo in his book without considering other factors. Also the same degree of critism is rarely leveled at other authors of glass guides who were equally as guilty.

Perhaps I am being a little sentimental in that his was one of the first books I purchased that brought me into the wonderful world of glass .... or maybe I should blame him for still being here 30 years later LOL     Happy New Year




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Offline Paul S.

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Re: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please
« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2017, 10:38:55 PM »
with hindsight and the natural improvement in our knowledge, it's very easy to criticize almost anyone and anything in the literature  -  I dare say there hasn't been a book published that with the passing of time has been found to be free of errors entirely.           The world has changed in the last three or four decades, and those of us now using the worlds vast store of instantly accessible information don't understand the limitations some of the earlier authors had to live with, before the proliferation of more accurate records...............    and it's very true that somewhere along the line someone had to start the ball rolling and do the spade work to give us at least some beginnings.           It seems to be a failing of human nature to criticize rather than be constructive.           

In the absence of any further comments post 30th June 2015, it would be of interest to at least know why Roy's belief that he'd solved the problem ground to a halt...........  ??

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Offline billben

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Re: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please
« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2017, 10:56:06 PM »
Perhaps he found some information ..........in an old book !!!   :D

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Offline flying free

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Re: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2017, 12:25:21 AM »
 'It seems to be a failing of human nature to criticize rather than be constructive.'

   or perhaps a failure to recognise constructive criticism? :)

'I wonder how many of those who do critise at some time purchased an item based purely on the photo in his book without considering other factors'

In turn, I wonder how many people sold items purporting to be some 'rare' piece produced by some English maker and garnering themselves large sums of money for their time, only for the buyer to become aware  years later that the piece was e.g. a mass produced 1930s piece of Bohemian glass worth a tenth of the value they paid for it?

I have seen many items that are unmarked but claim to be Stevens and Williams or Thomas Webb, with absolutely no primary reference to support those claims.
And in my opinion I think that is a problem.  I think it devalues the glass market as a collectable market.  And it cheats the buyer if the item transpires to have not been the rare, beautifully made  piece they were sold.

   Basically it is important that buyers are not misled... by using incorrect reference sources which appear to add validity to an incorrect attribution.

The big problem with the book is that there appear to be numerous incorrectly identified items.  Not just the odd one (which does happen in other books - and I certainly have a French book that I don't use as a reference any more because again, there are numerous errors which means it's difficult to be sure which items really are correct).  This means that unless you are very au fait with glass you wouldn't know how to pick out the errors. And even if you are au fait with glass,there are certainly items in the Manley book that I have no idea whether or not he is correct, but something has made me question the item.

I'm not sure I understood the point you made here:
' I would also add that an identifiction on an internet web site (commercial mainly but not specifically) is also no gurantee that the webowner got it right.'

Were you saying that other people also get it wrong? so that makes it even stevens?
I agree with your comment above, but that doesn't make it ok that the Manley book is used as a reference source.

Or were you saying that without a primary reference source then it could be concluded that Manley 'might have been right'?
Yes, you could argue that without primary reference sources to support each and every item in query, then one could say 'but it could be right', however I think  in the case of many of the items in the book,  there is more than one reason why they are thought to be, or indeed are, by other makers.  Or are in question.

Therefore in my opinion it's a lovely book and a 'good to have' but it's not a book that should be used as a reference source. 


m


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Offline billben

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Re: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2017, 02:00:19 AM »
One only has to look at the Art Market to see how so called experts 'get it wrong' ... or perhaps in some cases deliberately mislead. It happens in all walks of collectable life not just in glass.

The point I was trying to make regarding glass reference websites is (a bit like wikipedia),  many people mistakenly belive if its on a 'reputable' website it must be right .... in fact some people belive if anythign is on the internet it must be right.

We may be looking at this from different perspectives in that your reference to Manleys book woudl appear to be mainly on Art Glass/Blown Glass, whilst I do love all glass my own preference has always been for Victorian 'high end' pressed glass and perhaps the reason for my dissapointment with the critism of Manleys book is that there were other 'major' books on Victorian Pressed Glass at the time which made as many mistakes as Manley, but critisim of those was almost like attacking the Holy Grail.

I fully agree with you that I would not use Manleys book as an absolute reference, however I still feel we owe him a debt for introducing Victorian glass to us. 

All the best


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Offline Paul S.

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Re: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please
« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2017, 09:15:21 AM »
It's an unfortunate fact that the internet has gained a bad reputation when it comes to provenance/attribution of 'old things' (probably all old things) - which isn't a situation that should exist, and is an irony in any case, in view of the mostly reliable available literature published in the last twenty five years..........   but that's to ignore human nature, again.
Outside of those (like us perhaps) who have a genuine interest in the history and aesthetics of our past, there are many on the internet who flout
any sense of accuracy to simply make a quick profit - so yes, I'd agree that electronic communication has severely dented the reliability of buying on line.             Auction houses are little better ..............   another source of history where the common denominator is profit and not accuracy.
Remember the incident earlier this year with a well know Midlands auction house who seem to have been ready to put their lives on the line over a certain 'T/Webb' attribution -  and I never did hear back from them - which would appear to support the comment   ...  "with absolutely no primary reference to support those claims."
The internet seems to have been a heaven sent vehicle for those who have little or no interest in historic accuracy.
Is there a valid argument to say.....   "this is my living and I can't afford the time to check details or acquire all the books necessary to find the correct attribution/provenance."   -    probably not, but the tide is too powerful now to stop, sadly.

Visit most 'antiques' fairs/markets these days and you can almost count the genuine antiques on the fingers of one hand  -  in fact I'm often the oldest thing there!
I understand that some original pressed glass moulds have been re-used (particularly on the other side of the pond??) - and are these modern pressings sold as being not antique??  -  I suspect not.

quote ....................  "or perhaps a failure to recognise constructive criticism? :)"  .......... I could be way off beam m, but if this comment was aimed at Manley's effort, then I don't think it's really appropriate in the context of all that we're saying now............   no doubt that in the late 1970s - and earlier - when he was compiling his book, there was little opportunity for external eyes to criticise his words, in the way this might happen now.            It's probably only been in the last twenty years that the errors have come to light  -  the GMB wasn't around when Manley might have needed us ;).
I wouldn't part with my copy  -  the pix are great, and it was his book that helped me with the history and attribution for the uranium Derbyshire goblet (item 354) - see page 37 - long before I was a habitual visitor to Kew    ...........   this piece is now I think with another Board member.

In his acknowledgments, Manley doesn't mention using what we now know as the National Archives at Kew (they were then the Public Record Office), and information was vastly more difficult to access............   and just think of the level of conversation his work has generated, so can't have been all bad. ;)



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Offline billben

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Re: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please
« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2017, 09:31:36 AM »
Thanks for your welcome comments Paul.

Positive Identification has and will continue to be an area of discussion/argument and in some cases the publication of discovered catalogues can create its own problems.   I recall (too many years ago) a case of the covered sugar with 2 dogs as handles and a cat as the pommel on the lid. Clearly shown in Davidsons Cat of about 1885 I think.   I had in my possesion at the time a German catalogue showing the same item produced in Germany in around 1880 (this applied to a few of Davidson patterns as well.   Despite the possibility of conflict, many 'reputable' dealers refused to accept that the one they were selling could be anything but Davidsons  ("....... see its there in the catalogue").   I guess that it depends on which side of the table you are standing.     Anyway lets be honest its the search for the 'genuine' article that keeps us all interested, if it was clear cut (the identification, not the glass) then it would be too easy and I suspect we woudl find another area of collection.

All the best

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Offline flying free

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Re: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please
« Reply #17 on: January 02, 2017, 09:44:56 AM »
:)
To be honest, I was referring to that fact that some  might view any criticism of Manley's book on Victorian Glass as being made with mean intentions, rather than seeing it as constructive criticism, i.e. the manner in which it is intended.

Billben, I understand more clearly the point you are making, after you expanded here:

'... my dissapointment with the critism of Manleys book is that there were other 'major' books on Victorian Pressed Glass at the time which made as many mistakes as Manley, but critisim of those was almost like attacking the Holy Grail.'

and also in your post directly above this one.

 I don't collect pressed glass so I've no idea about other titles on that but I think it is acknowledged on the board that catalogues are a good source on the research trail, but not a primary source of reference in the same way that pattern books would be.

I think pressed glass has many more id hoops to jump through than blown glass because of copies and moulds being sold etc. 
However identifying any antique glass is always difficult.  That's the joy and fun of collecting glass :) 
(But not if it is being used arbitrarily and deliberately to profit from a mis-identification).

This current thread might explain what I've been trying to say about misuse of misidentification a little better:
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,60722.msg359165.html#msg359165
The seller of the piece in the last post in that thread has a title for selling the piece that doesn't reflect the information given at the bottom of the large body of text they have supplied.
Caveat emptor.


m


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Offline mhgcgolfclub

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Re: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please
« Reply #18 on: January 02, 2017, 12:21:18 PM »
My memory is not as good as it used to be . Although only 18 months or so ago I seemed to remember buying the same hand vase. If I posted that I could solve the mystery hand vase it must have meant that the one I bought was marked.

I been looking through 1000's of pictures but cannot find the vase yet , I will keep looking. Why I did not post pictures at the time I am not sure.

Marinka may be able to help as I am pretty sure I contacted her at the time. I remember selling the hand vase which may have been to Marinka so she may hold the final answer unless I find find the pictures I took at the time.

Roy

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: Help identify J Derbyshire type vase please
« Reply #19 on: January 02, 2017, 12:51:32 PM »
many thanks Roy  -  just think folks, we might be teetering on the edge of a real breakthrough to a problem that has puzzled us for decades...........
sitting here with bated breath Roy.............    ;D

P.S.    oh, and wanted to thank those Board members who have posted their good wishes for 2017 - and to whom I return the compliment.   Mostly I'd like to be 39 again, but I guess can't turn the clock back 10 years   -  just too much I suppose ;) :-*

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