Author Topic: Paperweights website... enjoy! :)  (Read 3562 times)

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Offline Frank

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Paperweights website... enjoy! :)
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2005, 09:40:39 AM »
One point of collecting is focus. Focus is essential to most as it gives a purpose and direction to a collection and by following its theme it is possible to create a cohesive collection.

You could collect paperweights and decide the focus was on having an example of each type and identifiable maker - this would give a representative collection of the weights made as giftware, craft producton and art production.

Or you can focus on a particular style, country or maker. In the latter case the collection can be built to show the development of technique. By collecting Paul Ysart, you build a collection that represents the re-emergence of the paperweight in the 20th century as well as the work of one of the masters of the discipline. Obviously this type of collecting is a popular focus and as a result leads to higher prices based on supply and demand.

The snake weights are relatively rare and a nominal price of around $1,000 is current, variation around that mark is related to the individual merits of each weight and of course how many want it.

The record for a PY is the 5,000 pounds, or so, paid for a Monart flower pot weight from the personal collection of Paul Ysart at the Ian Turner sale. About the same time two others, of the same type, sold in other auctions for a fraction of that price.

The US art weights fetch a lot more, with Paul Stankards fetching thousands of dollars brand new.

One advantage of targetting Chinese weights would be that it can result in a superb reference collection that can lead to breakthroughs in knowledge of the genre.
Frank A.
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Offline Leni

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Paperweights website... enjoy! :)
« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2005, 01:14:22 PM »
Quote from: "Frank"
One point of collecting is focus. Focus is essential to most as it gives a purpose and direction to a collection and by following its theme it is possible to create a cohesive collection.

 :lol:  There's my problem, Frank!  Lack of focus!  :roll:  :oops:
Quote
One advantage of targetting Chinese weights would be that it can result in a superb reference collection that can lead to breakthroughs in knowledge of the genre.

Ah, now I'm 'back on track' a bit  :D  

Probably the first paperweight I even bought was a little Chinese crimped flower weight, bought in the '60's.  Simple and small, but quite nicely made.  Since I started 'serious' collecting I have bought a few more Chinese weights, mainly because they're what I can afford!  :roll:

I have one of the c1930's Chinese millefiore weights which were supposed to be copies of the French; a couple more crimped flower weights, because they were pretty, cheap, and have slightly different and more elaborate petal styles from my '60's one; and more recently, a couple with slightly more interesting techniques  :shock:

For example, one recent acquisition is one of the crimped flowers with lampwork bees and frogs, very nicely done and certainly IMHO as good as some early attempts of the now more famous 'names' in paperweight circles (whom I won't actually name :wink: )

Another is a large weight with an upright flower, crimped again, but with a delicate little torsade carefully placed around the central cane to give the impression of stamens.  This flower rises from a carpet ground made of the same canes used for the centre of the flower - a sort of white on green cross.  IMO it's a really good attempt!  I can see someone trying very hard to make something attractive, not just churning out hundreds of cheap tat weights (such as some of the Muranese are guilty of doing!  :P )

So that's the Chinese 'focus' of my collection!   :wink:

However, I'd really like to focus on the more expensive antique weights like my treasured Clichy, or perhaps some really good modern American lampwork, like Stankard or D'Onofrio or Tarsitano!   :shock:

Well, a girl can dream, eh?    :lol:  :wink:

Leni
Leni


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Paperweights website... enjoy! :)
« Reply #12 on: June 05, 2005, 01:41:10 PM »
Quote from: "Frank"
One point of collecting is focus. Focus is essential to most as it gives a purpose and direction to a collection and by following its theme it is possible to create a cohesive collection.

You could collect paperweights and decide the focus was on having an example of each type and identifiable maker -.



Hi Frank

Taking your latter point as a reference is that not something of a rather far reaching panoramic focus as it does not appear to exclude much other than maybe variation within a theme. Sounds a bit like focus ..and but yes its ok to focus on eveything..... or perhaps I am being oblique and reading this the wrong way.
Anyway with regards to collecting paperweights I have approx 70 and the only discernable factor I have focused on to date is quite simply wether I liked it or not. If I had the space, and not inconsequentionally the money, I could easily end up with thousands of all sorts.... so perhaps focus is as much practical as it is preferential...... supposition really though as I am extremely unlikely to put it to the test.....

But just when you think its safe to step back into the waters  there is that niggle ( Captain paranoia I think is how Ben Elton described it ) hammering away that if I did win the lottery or whatever would I then overturn my rural edicts and pump just for the elite pieces..... I have my suspicions that my working mans humility is fraudulent.....
 Perhaps after all its only the poor that can afford poverty!


Regards


Gareth


Morgan48


Offline Frank

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Paperweights website... enjoy! :)
« Reply #13 on: June 05, 2005, 02:55:09 PM »
Quote from: "Gareth"
... something of a rather far reaching panoramic focus as it does not appear to exclude much ...


It excludes nothing and is a good solution for low budgets as there is never the imperative to compete for something that might go high. Just following the eye for liking is one point. But it is equally valid to buy just because of a different technique, or whatever, that you do not have an example of. Such a collection can never be complete but could build to 90% or more of the styles, techniques, countries of paperweights in a reasonable period.
Frank A.
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Offline KevinH

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Paperweights website... enjoy! :)
« Reply #14 on: June 06, 2005, 05:28:38 PM »
Quality, Focus, Superiority / Inferiority ... I think it's all down to personal taste and personal interpretations, much of which (unfortunately?) is based on prior opinions of others rather than objective facts.

As for the PY Snake weight that Frank did not buy, the winning bid of approx £485 was actually fairly cheap compared to prices that have been paid for similarly sized and similarly designed weights.

I have not seen a similar Snake weight from China so I can't comment on any comparison with the PY version. But I have seen some from Murano and when examined "in the flesh" the PY weights are, in my opinion, of much better quality and therefore I would be happier to pay a (substantially) higher price for the PY than for the Murano.

I will also say that I don't believe the "Chinese" syndrome applies only to that country. Some European work has been mentioned as possibly of inferior quality - and for paperweights that is as true as it is for any other continent or country. Peter Von Brackel wrote a wonderful book on 19th and early 20th century European weights and illustrated many examples of basic "frit and bubble" types. If I had to choose between a better quality Chinese weight and one of the 19th Century European "frit and bubble" examples, the Chinese one would win.

What about the "superioty" that has been given by some folk to 19th century French weights? When it comes to French Snake weights I have yet to see one that I would happily place in my collection - regardless of whether it was "affordable". That may be because the only French examples I have seen for real have been of lesser quality than those which seem to be restricted to "Amazingly Important" auctions by the likes of Sotheby's New York.

But getting back to basics, I don't think it is really possible to describe the differences in quality of any item with just a few words. It needs a "hands on" comparison to appreciate all the nuances. It's the same with the generalisations about the inferiorty of Chinese (and other) pieces - only direct, personal comparisons can provide the facts for any individual to decide which, if any, are better. And even then it's still down to personal choice.

If anyone fancies making direct personal comparisons of their Chinese (or Murano or European) weights with PY ones, then bring them along to the "Paperweight day" at Broadfield House on Saturday 13th August. The theme is "All Things Scottish" and I am scheduled to be there, along with several of my PY weights. Although most weights will be locked away in display cabinets, I will most likely have a few samples available for a "hands on experience".
KevinH

 

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