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Author Topic: Alabastro vs opalino  (Read 1822 times)

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Offline TxSilver

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Alabastro vs opalino
« on: August 23, 2007, 01:45:08 PM »
I recently bought a couple of gorgeous pieces of glass. Embarrassing enough, I can't tell if they are alabastro or opalino. Is there a way to tell that a piece is alabastro? I read that it is made to look like alabaster rock, but to tell the truth, even the pieces I know are alabastro look like opalino glass to me. Is there a good reference that discusses the different types of glass, what to look for, and how they are made? I am often confused about whether to call glass opalescent, opaline, opalino, or alabastro. I must be visually impaired when it comes to glass.  :-[

Anita
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Offline Ivo

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Re: Alabastro vs opalino
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2007, 03:25:55 PM »
it can be both.
- Opalino is any milk glass (lattimo) with a thin colour coating, aka incammiciato.
- If the coating is marbled it would be Albastro - and still have the white inner casing.
- Opaline (confusing, wot?) is a French term for pastel glass coloured in the mass. 
- Opal glass is semitransparent white
- Opalescent glass reflects a milky blue or pearly light

Offline TxSilver

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Re: Alabastro vs opalino
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2007, 02:05:03 AM »
Thanks, Ivo. I have been reading some more about working with opalino and alabastro, but still don't have a good feel for the difference in the appearance of the different glasses. At least now I can discuss the different temperatures and times, as well as the compatibilities with other glasses. If I ever become a gaffer, I'll be ready.  :) I have a lot of respect for the two glasses now. I am surprised that they -- particularly the alabastro -- do not cost a lot more. Quite an art that requires a lot of time and patience.

Anita
Anita
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Offline bidda

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Re: Alabastro vs opalino
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2007, 08:46:27 PM »
Ivo,
is opaline just the colored version of opal glass? i assume all forms of opal/opaline/opalino/opalescent to be at least semi-transluscent; would that be correct?

your definition of opalino confuses me a bit, though. what distinguishes opalino from other color/white cased glass? i've seen lots of lattimo glass thinly cased with colored glass that i would never have thought to call opalino.

is alabastro always marbled in appearance? honestly, i don't think i've ever seen an alabastro piece if so (not to say i haven't seen scads of pieces labeled as such ;) ) and the "white inner casing" ? most of the pieces i've seen called alabastro look similar to paste glass (pate de verre) only more transluscent? i thought that semi-transluscent pastel colored glass that has an almost grainy look to it was alabastro. if that's not alabastro, what is it?

oy...

thanks and have a beautiful day!

bidda




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Offline TxSilver

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Re: Alabastro vs opalino
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2007, 10:33:51 PM »
Bidda, I believe you are right. I have had quite a few pieces I knew were opalino. They were milky with at trace of some color, e.g. blue or rose. Milk glass (lattimo) may be used in the canes to give the opaline character -- I don't know. I read alabastro is opaque and looks like alabaster. I seem to have alabastro blindness. I tried to buy a piece of it a couple of days ago on eBay, but didn't bid enough. :( I will probably understand better if I can get some alabastro in hand.

Anita
Anita
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Offline Carolyn Preston

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Re: Alabastro vs opalino
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2007, 01:09:52 AM »
Maybe one of our better connected collectors could take a picture of each and put them up here well labeled and then we could maybe see what is what.  :chky: I'm totally confused now.  ::)

Carolyn

 

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