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Author Topic: Mystery Object ...from Nazeing  (Read 3643 times)

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Offline selina

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Re: Mystery Object ...from Nazeing
« Reply #40 on: September 14, 2007, 12:32:19 AM »
After reading all these posts...I didnt really care what the item ended up being :) But I so enjoyed all the guesses and the subsequent history!

I will be looking at all glass items a little differently now as I forget that they have a practical use generally and not just aesthetic.

Trudy
Trudy

Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing, than he who believes what is wrong.


Offline ChrisStewart

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Re: Mystery Object ...from Nazeing
« Reply #41 on: September 14, 2007, 07:23:03 AM »

Send two-and-six, we're going to a dance. ;)


Shouldn't  that be three-and-fourpence?

Chris
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Offline David E

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Re: Mystery Object ...from Nazeing
« Reply #42 on: September 14, 2007, 07:46:05 AM »
Er, yes, I think it probably should be! Can't think why I've got that stuck in my mind wrongly... must be thinking of something else... :-[
David
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Offline josordoni

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Re: Mystery Object ...from Nazeing
« Reply #43 on: September 14, 2007, 08:56:17 AM »
Maybe you only went to cheap dances??   >:D


Offline David E

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Re: Mystery Object ...from Nazeing
« Reply #44 on: September 14, 2007, 08:58:45 AM »
I don't dance! :mus:
David
► Chance Additions ◄
The 2nd volume of the domestic glassware of Chance Brothers
Contact ► Cortex Design ◄ to order any book


Offline David E

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Re: Mystery Object ...from Nazeing
« Reply #45 on: September 14, 2007, 09:05:33 AM »

Send two-and-six, we're going to a dance. ;)


Shouldn't  that be three-and-fourpence?

Chris
That's inflation for you! ;D
David
► Chance Additions ◄
The 2nd volume of the domestic glassware of Chance Brothers
Contact ► Cortex Design ◄ to order any book


Offline Max

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Re: Mystery Object ...from Nazeing
« Reply #46 on: September 14, 2007, 09:19:57 AM »
Adam said:
Quote
I had put that part of my career behind me and industrial archaeology had hardly been thought of.

Umm...it's funny how those things that aren't so important at the time become worthy of consideration after the history is almost lost!  Golly, that was a long sentence, did it make sense?  :)

Thanks for writing your experience down Adam.  It all seems a bit strange, getting the production manager to do the tip runs.  Who was looking after the production line while you were out?  Dare I ask!   :o

I suppose that's how companies used to be run, none of the run-a-tight-ship and economic strategies we have now?  But as you intimated, maybe those reasons were part of the overall decline of Davidsons. 

Anyway.  I must say that my story about the moulds/motorway was about Sowerby in 1972.  Is there a remote chance it might be true, or has it all become mixed up with the parlous state of Davidson's Bedford lorry somehow? 

:::can feel Bernard typing furiously 'No no no no no!'::::
I am not a man


Offline Bernard C

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Re: Mystery Object ...from Nazeing
« Reply #47 on: September 14, 2007, 09:46:00 AM »
Quote from: Max
... I must say that my story about the moulds/motorway was about Sowerby in 1972.  Is there a remote chance it might be true, or has it all become mixed up with the parlous state of Davidson's Bedford lorry somehow? 

:::can feel Bernard typing furiously 'No no no no no!'::::

Max — No no no no no!   The two lorry anecdotes are quite separate.   The Sowerby/Nazeing/furniture lorry/moulds strewn across the road anecdote is in Cottle, and was told to Simon Cottle by Harry Hutchinson, a former Sowerby employee.   Adam, do you remember him?

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Adam

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Re: Mystery Object ...from Nazeing
« Reply #48 on: September 15, 2007, 10:58:48 AM »
Anne - thanks for that: you will see what I've done.

Max - Davidson (and Sowerby) production normally was carried out on two shifts, 6-2 and 2-10.  Each had a foreman who was more than capable of handling any immediate problems!  I was annointed production manager quite late in my time at Davidsons - the first job title I had had at either place (that was how we worked - everyone mucked in at whatever was needed).  The "appointment" didn't make a scrap of difference either money-wise or to what I had been doing anyway.

Bernard - yes, I knew Harry very well.  He was inspection foreman (or words to that effect - see above) and also our first-aider.  He was well qualified at both jobs, having been a young, skilled glassmaker pre-war and then a sick bay attendant in the Navy, during which he was awarded the DCM.  I remember him attending our only fatal accident in my time, nothing to do with glass, someone fell through a roof.  He was the only qualified glassmaker on Sowerbys' staff.

That last point brings up a little-known fact, for which I have no explanation at all.  The production foremen at Sowerbys had started out either as labourers or semi-skilled assistants whereas at Davidson they had all been skilled glassmakers.  Indeed, while I was at D., a vacancy arose and Tom Barton (GM - my boss) made the brave decision to appoint by far our best presser specialising in big Holophane jobs (still on thread!!) as foreman for the long-term gain in spite of the short-term production loss.  The strong glassmakers' union meant that, once a man was appointed to management he could not even touch a glass-making tool.  For the historians, this was Charlie Tulip, who quickly became a trusted friend and colleague.

Max - this is your thread and it seems to be getting a bit off topic in spite of my valiant effort in the last para!  I'm not clever enough to split threads, but if you or anyone want sort this out it's fine by me!


 

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