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Author Topic: squarefooted covered bowls 1820s  (Read 1045 times)

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Offline Ivo

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squarefooted covered bowls 1820s
« on: September 12, 2007, 05:42:06 PM »
Items in full:
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-8458
Decoration detail:
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-8457
Knop:
http://glassgallery.yobunny.org.uk/displayimage.php?pos=-8456


This 11" pair just screams 1820s - 1840s to me due to the square foot. It also screamed "Belgium"  until I checked the books: It is not Vonêche or Louis Zoude, who both made similar items but in substantially thicker crystal. This is blown and much thinner, and the crystal has a somewhat greyish tinge. The additional decoration of lines and stars (no straight lines anywhere) looks like Items I've seen in glass from Ireland or Sweden.

Is there anyone sufficiently confident in the early 19th century to venture an attrib?




Ivo
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Offline josordoni

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Re: squarefooted covered bowls 1820s
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2007, 07:17:42 PM »
Isn't that what they call a lemon squeezer foot?

I think that can be found on Irish crystal of that date or earlier?


Offline Ivo

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Re: squarefooted covered bowls 1820s
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2007, 08:00:17 PM »
Never heard that term but it sounds right - the construction looks like a lemon squeezer! I seem to remember seeing  similar items in the Dublin museum many years ago. So many in fact that I cannot remember what they looked like...
Ivo
► BLUE HENRY ◄
 New Book: The Almost Forgotten Story of the Blue Glass Sputum Flask

all texts and pictures (c) Ivo Haanstra.


Offline Max

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Re: squarefooted covered bowls 1820s
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2007, 08:58:07 PM »
If that is* a lemon squeezer foot, then it's funny because I was only hearing about them for the first time last weekend.  All I can say is apparently they COULD be an accessory (although that's probably not the right word) that could be bought by the hundred, and then used by different companys to complete their own style of cup or upper part.  What I mean is, the foot could be made by a different company to the top.  It was only when something like UV was used on complete pieces that it was discovered that they didn't necessarily start life as one unit.

*I couldn't identify a lemon squeezer base, as it's a new term I heard only during that conversation.


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Offline Anne

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Re: squarefooted covered bowls 1820s
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2007, 09:32:25 PM »
There's a pair of similar size and shape, but different decoration, listed in Lyles Glass (pg 100) as honeypots, early 19th century, but no origin given.  I'd never have figured them as honeypots personally, but there you go!


Offline Frank

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Re: squarefooted covered bowls 1820s
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2007, 07:56:24 AM »
These Urns can be found in profusion in Graydon-Stannus, the worst reference that could be hoped for  :o Continuing with that reference you also get the grey tinge and a Cork or Waterford attribution of 1780. Interestingly in the same section Honey pots are also shown and these clearly comes into the Urn category. All the examples shown are cut and the flutes around the top are considered an early Irish feature that got smaller, deeper and sharper over time. If course if these had passed through her hands they probably would have a lot more cutting, ;)

Davis, English & Irish Glass,  shows less ornately cut Urns & covers and states that they were made in France, England and Ireland with the French being of a lower quality. His examples have a more ornate stem. One has the flutes matching the edge of the cover as yours. Dates as Adam period c1770. The stars he describes as sprigs cut with an engraving wheel not stars which he shows as more elaborate. The plain stem would also suggest pre 1800 (at least for glasses) and he suggests that identification to a glassworks or England/Ireland is seldom possible apart from specific techniques.

So to summarise, maybe Irish, English or French, probably earlier than 1800 and maybe Swedish.
Frank A.
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Offline Bernard C

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Re: squarefooted covered bowls 1820s
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2007, 09:01:00 AM »
Ivo — I looked through Lloyd, Elville, and Crompton with no success.   Hughes plate 36 is of similar shape and is described as a Sweetmeat bowl & cover, circa 1800.

No luck with the decoration.

I thought the lemon squeezer feet could be a bit tight, as if reduced, but most of the examples in the books are just as tight, so no concerns there.

Sorry I can't help more.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Ivo

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Re: squarefooted covered bowls 1820s
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2007, 09:03:18 AM »
That is a great help - but thanks to the lemon squeezer foot I managed to find identical features in "Investing in Georgian Glass" , Ward Lloyd, 1969. He actually calls them "lemon squeezer foot", too. His examples all date between 1796 and 1806 and are quite accurate due to engravings of Sunderland bridge (1796) and Trafalgar (1806) . All his examples are from Sunderland.
Great to have them narrowed down so much.
Ivo
► BLUE HENRY ◄
 New Book: The Almost Forgotten Story of the Blue Glass Sputum Flask

all texts and pictures (c) Ivo Haanstra.


Offline Bernard C

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Re: squarefooted covered bowls 1820s
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2007, 09:35:36 AM »
I noticed them too in Lloyd.   I think you have to be careful in drawing that conclusion, Ivo, as, like all authors, Lloyd was probably restricted on plates, with the result that he would naturally choose pieces that illustrated as many features as possible.   Lemon squeezer feet were probably used over a much longer period.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Frank

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Re: squarefooted covered bowls 1820s
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2007, 09:40:25 AM »
Interestingly in the same section Honey pots are also shown and these clearly comes into the Urn category.

Should read: Interestingly in the same section Honey pots are also shown and these are clearly different, yours comes into the Urn category.

can a moderator correct the original please.
Frank A.
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