Glass Discussion & Research. No ID requests here please. > British & Irish Glass

Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?

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Max:

--- Quote ---So trying to illustrate 20th Century domestic glass design with only Brits results in an incomplete picture which will surely leave the observer wondering.
--- End quote ---

Fraaaaaaaaank!  It's not an ideal world out there, and a museum has to start somewhere.  Surely the most important thing is securing items for preservation before the history is lost?  We could argue which nationalilities should be included until the cows come home...but it's not progress for the museum, is it?   :huh:

I just can't imagine the complexities of starting a museum from scratch.  I guess one has to keep it simple to start with?






Frank:
 :) Sure Max. I was discussing issues raised and exploring them, not particularly making judgements.

Bernard C:
You all appear to have forgotten the two most influential, Adam Dodds I, and Ernest Jobling-Purser.

Bernard C.  8)

Glen:

--- Quote from: Bernard C on September 19, 2007, 11:43:18 AM ---You all appear to have forgotten the two most influential, Adam Dodds I, and Ernest Jobling-Purser.

Bernard C.  8)

--- End quote ---

You took the words right out of my mouth, Bernard. Adam Dodds I for his Tynesyde Glassware (and more). And may I add John Jenkins too?

Bernard C:

--- Quote from: Glen on September 19, 2007, 12:20:54 PM ---
--- Quote from: Bernard C on September 19, 2007, 11:43:18 AM ---You all appear to have forgotten the two most influential, Adam Dodds I, and Ernest Jobling-Purser.

Bernard C.  8)

--- End quote ---

You took the words right out of my mouth, Bernard. Adam Dodds I for his Tynesyde Glassware (and more). And may I add John Jenkins too?

--- End quote ---

I forgot to say why.   Thanks, Glen, for explaining Adam's grandfather.   I included Ernest Jobling-Purser, not for his 1930s art glass, much of it modelled by Etienne Franckhauser (sic), but for his Pyrex.

What was important was what was sold in huge quantities in Woolworth's, Home & Colonial, and the Co-op, not expensive glass sold to the wealthy in a handful of London shops.

Now, Glen, who was John Jenkins?   I've heard the name before, but I can't remember where!

Bernard C.  8)

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