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Author Topic: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?  (Read 40202 times)

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Offline johnphilip

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Offline Frank

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 good artist, but designer?
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Offline johnphilip

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Surely Artist Designer . ???

Offline mhgcgolfclub

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Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
« Reply #83 on: September 15, 2016, 11:42:09 AM »
Roys wife posting here <waves>, hope this doesn't appear rude, but why would you exclude vases and perfume bottles from an exhibition of glass? domestic means the home and people do still have vases in their homes and show me one female who doesnt have a perfume bottle for display even if empty, even my daughter who has zero interest in glass hankers after a nice iridescent atomiser from times past.
You cant exclude items on the basis they are no longer used otherwise you may as well exclude other clutter people very rarely use nowadays such as decanting anything into pots such as mint, mustard, marmalade, butter dishes, match strikers,  etc, so many people do not bother.

If I was visiting a museum with my other half or the family, I would not go somewhere just to view tableware/functional/industrial design,  that is a man thing only imo and far too lofty. Being of a creative & artistic bent myself I would want to view the decorative too, cant there be a mixture of the two?
Not my museum of course, just my opinion.

Offline David E

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Re: Who are the important British Domestic Glass designers of the 20th century?
« Reply #84 on: September 15, 2016, 11:57:26 AM »
Hello Roy's wife <waves back>.

Industrial design is something I am very keen on, but I wouldn't agree it's just a "man thing"  :D

I proposed the designed Robert Goodden, whose 1934 Spiderweb design of fruit bowls, dishes, plates, celeries, parfaits, grapefruits, et al, really stood the test of time and was only dropped by Chance Brothers in the mid-1950s: a span of nearly 20 years. But I am also very keen on collecting 20th-century art glass and the majority of answers here are putting forwards artists and designers from this period.

Broadfield House Glass Museum contained an excellent mix of both although, understandably, the emphasis was on the superior end of the market, in particular Stourbridge glass. I'm all for the eclectic mix of all forms of glass and glassware: it's what made Britain.
David
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Offline SaraCampbell

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Over the previous twenty years approximately a greater understanding has actually grown of the job of 20th century British glass manufacturers and designers. A great deal was achieved by the significant and also influential event "British Glass In between the Wars" held at Broadfield House Glass Gallery in 1987, which recognised work by Monart, Gray-Stan, James Stuart flower holder with decor made by Graham Sutherland. Stuart flower holder with decoration designed by Graham Sutherland (Circa 1934) Powell, Stuart & Sons, Thomas Webb, Webb Corbett and Stevens & Williams (Royal Brierley) as well as developers such as Keith Murray and Clyne Farquharson. Currently, the brochure modified by Roger Dodsworth for this program is still considered as one of one of the most insightful books available on the subject.

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