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Author Topic: Victorian Rolling Pin, possibly Uranium? Date and Maker?  (Read 1305 times)

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Offline Anne

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Re: Victorian Rolling Pin, possibly Uranium? Date and Maker?
« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2007, 03:25:45 PM »
Small article on Swansea Heritage Net website about these glass pins here, David:
http://www.swanseaheritage.net/article/gat.asp?ARTICLE_ID=220


Offline David E

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Re: Victorian Rolling Pin, possibly Uranium? Date and Maker?
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2007, 05:22:17 PM »
Thanks Anne, most useful. Again, similarities, particularly with respect to the colour.

Not sure about the legend of sailors taking home rolling pins to their wives as presents - I thought it was the other way around: weren't they given to sailors by their wives as a parting gift? Otherwise, where were the sailors buying them from? It also explains why Nailsea made them, being so close to Bristol port!
David
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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Victorian Rolling Pin, possibly Uranium? Date and Maker?
« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2007, 05:37:00 PM »
I think the "never used as rolling pins" only applies the decorated ones, glass rolling pins are great. Why would sailors want them David? Don't forget many sailors probably only went round the coast. They were also more likely to have money on disembarking before making their way home than for buying them en-route.


Offline David E

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Re: Victorian Rolling Pin, possibly Uranium? Date and Maker?
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2007, 05:44:19 PM »
Well, they often had mottos on, like "Be good to me", or some such - think it was more of a warning than anything else. ;D

So if Nailsea workers were making rolling pins, the ready market would have been Bristol, otherwise, the sailors would have bought them while at another port, which also had a glassworks close by. Too much of a coincidence? That was my thinking anyway and I'm pretty sure I've read something along these lines in a Pottery Gazette and Glass Trade Review, c.1940, on the history of friggers (think this article was spread over about 10 months).
David
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Offline Frank

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Re: Victorian Rolling Pin, possibly Uranium? Date and Maker?
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2007, 10:29:08 AM »
There is always speculation about why one end was left open, A glance at any modern glass rolling pins instruction is clear, "Fill with ice or iced water for use." They are more effective chilled.
Frank A.
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Offline David E

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Re: Victorian Rolling Pin, possibly Uranium? Date and Maker?
« Reply #15 on: September 27, 2007, 07:38:33 PM »
Yes, makes better pastry - I think Leni mentioned this on a similar thread about hollow glass pins? But my mother still churns out excellent pies with her trusty wooden pin!

Going back to Christine's mail: I agree - this one does look as though it has been used. Only very slight marks and scratches, but quite a few of 'em! Not hollow though, which is a bit odd.
David
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