Author Topic: Walter Thornhill  (Read 1826 times)

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Offline Frank

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Walter Thornhill
« on: October 23, 2007, 11:57:29 AM »
Does anyone now when Walter Thornhill & Co., 144 New Bond Street, London. Retailer - Cutler, Silversmiths, Bagmakers, & c., Established 1734. closed down?

Googling brings up lots of pieces attributed to him as the maker,  :-\ there is also some glass, including mostly superb examples, in his 1894 catalogue that states that some are registered designs and also some with suggestions of items being Thornhill design but often in that ambiguous manner which leaves you wondering!

Clearly a retailer that liked his name on things but just as clearly not the maker that some auction listings would have you believe. What Thornhill items are in dealer stocks, they correctly ID as a retailer, are serious money.
Frank A.
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Offline Sue C

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Re: Walter Thornhill
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2007, 05:46:13 PM »
Frank try here, they have a library http://www.thegoldsmiths.co.uk/welcome/


Sklounion

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Re: Walter Thornhill
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2007, 07:13:00 PM »
So late Victorian version of Asprey's.
Did not register a sponsors mark in 1734, so probably bought out someone else.....
Certainly does not show in Jackson's as early as alleged, or as a maker at any time in London, hence no sponsors mark.
M


Offline Frank

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Re: Walter Thornhill
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2007, 07:57:43 PM »
Goldsmiths are helpful. Although there records are sometimes incorrect. My last enquiry failed but I later found the answer and they were able to correct it.

Marcus, I noted that where a piece of silver had a makers mark it did not relate to their name. Look very much like an Asprey's style of operation, Royal Warrant and all
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
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Sklounion

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Re: Walter Thornhill
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2007, 09:47:09 PM »
Very typical. Item could be designed by "a", made by "b" and sold by..... Anyone.
Interestingly, if he is still alive, a man surname Sparrow, could lay many of the myths of 20th century silver.
You clearly need to talk to people like Norman Bassent to get to the bottom of things.
Contact me in a couple of weeks, and I may be able to forward your research.
Regards,
Marcus

 

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