Author Topic: JOBLING glass  (Read 4549 times)

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Offline Tony H

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JOBLING glass
« on: June 30, 2005, 08:31:50 AM »
Hi Everyone

The links below are to English pressed glass each piece has on the inside in raised letters BRITISH MADE.

The Jobling three handle bowl pattern 2077 aka ice cube has the same BRITISH MADE on the inside, I have it in Jade green and also two clear examples .

Can anyone help with ID of the three pieces in photos, are the Jobling, lettering looks the same on all.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v325/d554to/BritishMadefooteddish5inchesby3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v325/d554to/BritishMadebowlwithcrimpededge7.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v325/d554to/BritishMadebowl8.jpg

Tony H


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JOBLING glass
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2005, 10:53:44 AM »
Tony

I have had a look through a small catalogue of Joblings glass of the 1930's and cannot see any of these in there.... that in itself does not mean they are not Joblings.
However, more compelling, is that the designs on these 3 bowls are not typical of Joblings. Joblings tends to be either more specifically geometric in a deco sort of way, which these are not, or they use natural sources such as fir cones roses etc. I also noticed that very very few of their items were made with an integrated pedestal....they tended more towards either feet or a seperate stand.  Personally these look  much more like the output of a company with a more typical and conventional design remit.

Regards


Gareth


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Offline Tony H

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JOBLING glass
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2005, 08:41:42 PM »
Gareth
Thank you for your comments.

No 5000  Fir Cone Pattern and others are part of there Art glass range, I have a copy of a catalogue of the full range, but I thought they were still making table wear at the same time, see here


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v325/d554to/Weardale.jpg

 for an addvert for Weardale this has the Reg No 724094 and was from the same time.

I have had another look at the words BRITISH MAKE and I feel sure they are the same style font etc.

In my first post I put BRITISH MADE this should read BRITISH MAKE

Tony H


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JOBLING glass
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2005, 05:43:34 PM »
Hi Tony

Not sure how Weardale fits in with Joblings art glass items. The name and the design almost appears to be trading itself directly against Chippendale... but that might be coincidence.
Interstingly the reg number you quote precedes any registration number that relates to Joblings art glass... so therefore registered pre 1932.
There are members here, if I recall correctly, that are involved very much in the history of English pressed glass..... hopefully one of them will pick up on your question.

Regards


Gareth


Morgan48


Offline Tony H

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JOBLING glass
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2005, 07:29:45 PM »
Hi Gareth
Weardale is a line of table glass, the items I have linked to could be from the same time, it is the BRITISH MAKE on the inside of each piece which I feel is Jobling and could pre date there Art Glass range.

BERNARD
Have you seen this at all I remember your study with the Davidson Fostoria MADE IN ENGLAND. have you seen this BRITISH MAKE
on any glass apart from 2077 or have you seen these patterns.

GLEN
Feel free to jump in anytime, have you seen this at all. And anybody who is into early pressed glass would be greatfull for any help.

Tony H


Offline Glen

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« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2005, 07:52:29 PM »
Tony, I fear that I can only cast further confusion on the matter. I have two pieces of Carnival Glass that both have the letters BRITISH MAKE. I have been puzzled by them for some time. One is a plain little marigold bowl, and the letters are raised on the interior. The other is more of a puzzle - it is a stemmed sugar (comport) with an intaglio, stylised leaf band design. The letters BRITISH MAKE are cameo on the base. The nearest I have come to seeing that pattern elsewhere is in the catalogues of the Czech maker, Josef Rindskopf. I speculated wildly that the link between Molineaux Webb and Rindskopf might have resulted in a small amount of Carnival being made in the (circa) late 1920s at the Manchester Molineaux Webb works.

That is simply a hypothesy on my behalf - and I have no proof. But then neither do I know who made the pieces with BRITISH MAKE on them.

The pieces you showed are extremely interesting and I have not yet had the chance to investigate them fully (and I have to admit I was hoping someone might jump in with the answer  :? )

A great challenge and a real puzzle. Any one else care to add to it.........

Glen
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Offline Bernard C

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JOBLING glass
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2005, 05:15:04 AM »
Tony, et al — the three items of table glass are not in Jobling's 1936 catalogue.   Of course they could have been Greener/Jobling from the '20s or earlier, as by 1936 Jobling's production of flint tableware was obviously being wound down apart from the Weardale and 1054/1054½ suites.

1054/1054½ is interesting.    It is a very simple pattern with clean lines, 1054 with a 16-point base star with alternate points slightly longer, 1054½ without.    No other decoration, I have a lovely 1054 cupped 1+6 fruit set which is in intermittent use.   Low cupped floating bowls were made in both versions.

The 1054½ floating bowl was also made in jade, and a few were sold as sets with the jade 2541 Statue and Block (the scantily clad lady figurine with grapes), probably only for a very short time before Christmas 1933.   This is illustrated in the centre of a full page advertisement in PG of September 1, 1933, reproduced in Baker & Crowe.   Note that 2541 is an anagram of 54½, probably how they chose the pattern number.    It is shown with a strange tall plinth, probably just artistic licence, as there is no base ring on the floating bowl to locate with a plinth, and the two sets I have seen have both been plinthless.   The ex-factory gate trade on this set was 5/4½, which indicates a probable retail price of 8/11 or 9/11.   Expensive but quite beautiful; in my opinion much more elegant than the later sets in Fircone and other patterned bowls with added plinths.

As for attribution by comparison of lettering punches, Tony, it obviously has to be a perfect match on both size and font.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright © 2004–14 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Tony H

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JOBLING glass
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2005, 06:40:32 AM »
Glen and Bernard
Thank you both for your input to my topic, I will see if I can photo BRITISH MAKE and compare them with each other, will keep you posted.

Tony H


Offline Frank

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« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2005, 04:46:14 PM »
Quote from: "Bernard C"
As for attribution by comparison of lettering punches, Tony, it obviously has to be a perfect match on both size and font.


And of course you have to allow for glassmakers buying punches from the same maker!
Frank A.
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Offline Bernard C

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« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2005, 07:16:15 PM »
Quote from: "Frank"
Quote from: "Bernard C"
As for attribution by comparison of lettering punches, Tony, it obviously has to be a perfect match on both size and font.

And of course you have to allow for glassmakers buying punches from the same maker!

Good point, Frank.   However my own experience is that three quarters of a century or more ago a mouldmaker's set of hardened tool steel alphanumeric punches was as individual as a set of fingerprints.

The problem is that I don't know how these punches were made.   How do we find out?

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright © 2004–14 Bernard Cavalot

 

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