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Author Topic: A vaseline glass wine rinser!  (Read 3888 times)

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Offline mrvaselineglass

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A vaseline glass wine rinser!
« on: December 03, 2007, 01:16:05 PM »
I just wanted to share this fun piece with the group.  The wine rinser was used in both the 18th and 19th centuries in the elegant Victorian homes to rinse the wine glass between courses, as a new wine was served with each course.  In doing a google search, the Mount Vernon online store (home to George Washington), offers a reproduction and explains this information.  There are other google references also to wine rinsers on the internet.  That search (through several pages of listings) showed me amethyst, red, clear, cobalt, a dark green, and the closest one to mine, a uranium green version with etched grape leaves and grapes and cut panels near the bottom. 

Measuring across the round (not the spout area), it is 5 1/8" (13cm) and 3 1/4" tall (8cm).  There are nine cut flat panels around the outside and a 27-point star on the underside, which was cut in to hide the pontil mark.  It is leaded crystal and vaseline.  The stem is also leaded glass, but was purchased separately. 

I have seen only one other made in vaseline glass, and it was a perfect match to this one. 

http://www.vaselineglass.org/rinser1.jpg
http://www.vaselineglass.org/rinser2.jpg

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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: A vaseline glass wine rinser!
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2007, 04:18:38 PM »
Lovely Dave. So is yours an original or a repro... I lost the plot  :)

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Offline mrvaselineglass

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Re: A vaseline glass wine rinser!
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2007, 09:08:56 PM »
Christine:  definitely an original, and I don't think any have been reproduced in vaseline glass.  The reference was made to reproductions to show that original wine rinsers were used at Mt. Vernon (1770s time frame) and that they have been around a long time.  Mine was made sometime after 1840s and most likely before 1920s.  I use the end date of 1920's as I don't know if this is something that was made during the elegant period or not.  I know it is no newer than 1920s.  I don't know if it is US made, English, or Continental Europe. 

regards
Dave "Mr. Vaseline Glass" Peterson

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Offline josordoni

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Re: A vaseline glass wine rinser!
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2007, 09:58:26 PM »
I love the curved shape of this one... I have had several of the straight sided rinsers, with various designs of pillar cuts etc. but not one with this lovely rounded shape.

Thank you very much!

Lynne
x
Josordoni Collectables - eBay Store

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Offline flying free

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Re: A vaseline glass wine rinser!
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2013, 11:04:20 AM »
I have this one Dave
It has 16 petal cuts (? sorry not sure what they are called really)  around the body.
Honey coloured lead crystal uranium glass and a very large polished pontil mark which measures approx 2 3/4" diameter.
The bowl measures 3 1/2"high and diameter front to back is 4 1/2" at rim, with width lip to lip at rim 5 1/2".
I thought it might be Webb Richardson maybe and quite early 1800's but a complete guess as really I have no idea.
On the other hand I found an amethyst cut one that looks like the Richardson amethyst with a very large pontil mark also and thought that might date to later perhaps?  I was just going on the shape of it being early 1800's really but could be totally wrong  ;D

m

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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: A vaseline glass wine rinser!
« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2013, 11:16:02 AM »
I think the colour pushes it into the early 20th century; early 1800s is way to early for uranium glass (1830s at the earliest). Looks like Webb Sunshine amber but could be Walsh (or a.n. other)

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Offline flying free

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Re: A vaseline glass wine rinser!
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2013, 11:37:14 AM »
oh thanks Christine :)
I was thinking pre 1850 because of the shape really.

I've just remember your post here as well on the MW honeypot re the green aura and that early uranium glass does not have this -  this rinser does have a green aura in daylight around the rim. 
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,52256.msg296588.html#msg296588
It's not the same colour as my Walsh glasses, not as ambery yellow as they are. Much more yellow than amber.

The other amethyst one I found has similar cutting on it to the Walsh fruiting vine pattern, but the colour looks like the Richardson amethyst to me.

So perhaps Webb then or maybe Richardson also (did they do uranium glass?) and as you say a much later date.
Does Webb Sunshine amber have that green aura on it?
Looking at the few Webb Sunshine ambers mine doesn't look as browny amber as they are  :-\

m

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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: A vaseline glass wine rinser!
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2013, 12:56:11 PM »
It's not so much the early uranium that don't have the green aura, it's the ultra high lead content ("flint") glass that doesn't.

Sunshine amber does have the green aura and the amberiness seems to depend a bit on the thickness of the glass and angle of photography

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Offline flying free

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Re: A vaseline glass wine rinser!
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2013, 12:57:15 PM »
ok, thanks for that, I've never seen a Webb amber :)

Just for reference, this is where I got the possible early date from -  there is a group of wine rinsers here with one of them being the odd one out and  that looks the same as mine, same panel cuts, same size, second from right at the front, which were listed as early 19th century.
http://www.thecanterburyauctiongalleries.com/catalogue/57/ceramics_and_glassware?page=2
Reading their wording carefully though, only the 5 are listed as early 19th century, with an additional one, the additional one being the one that is the same as mine.

Scroll down on their site for the listing

m

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Offline flying free

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Re: A vaseline glass wine rinser!
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2013, 01:24:40 PM »
do you have any references to wine rinsers being used into the 20th century?
I can't  find any information that indicates this is an item that would have been used during that period  :-\


The Mount Vernon shop mentions their use during the 18th century
http://www.mountvernon.org/shop/new-shop/hand-blown-wine-rinser-and-tavern-glasses
and the JHU mentions 18th and 19th here
http://www.jhu.edu/~gazette/2006/25sep06/25hwood.html
and I found an  interesting link on Edwardian table for wines etc but no mention of use of wine rinsers
http://www.alexanderpalace.org/waitress/service-of-wines-guide-for-edwardian-servants



Felice Mehlman says in 'The Illustrated Guide to Glass'
'During the late 17th century, large silver and ceramic bowls with scalloped rims (for holding up to six glasses) known as monteiths were produced in England and elsewhere  ...  by the foot'.  Glass monteiths in c.1700 were rare, but smaller glass versions or 'coolers' holding up to two glasses, with one or two lips at the rim, appeared during the early 18th century, achieving their greatest popularity about 1750-1860.'

Whilst I know that the uranium content dictates how early it would have been made, I'm not sure this would have been made as late as into the 20th century.  I've found one in a picture of the Randolph link that is the same as mine, but clear glass.  The description of it is not the same as the picture of the one on the table (which is the same design as mine as far as I can see) - top picture.

http://foundinthecollection.blogspot.co.uk/2012_06_01_archive.html

m

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