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Author Topic: Cleaning decanters  (Read 4710 times)

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Offline MarkHill

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Cleaning decanters
« on: December 05, 2007, 08:59:56 PM »
Hi All,

Now it's that time of year when using a decanter becomes that little bit more special, I  just thought I'd mention an experience I had this weekend, in case it is of use. Perhaps everyone knows this already...but anyway.

I recently acquired a nice example of Dartington's FT44 decanter, designed by Frank Thrower. Hardly rare, I know, but I rather like them and they make good decanters that dinner party guests needn't get nervous about handling. After cleaning out some of the lime deposits using a diluted solution of acid, I noticed that there were some small (spirit) crystals that just wouldn't shift. I tried everything from soaking overnight and longer, to using dry rice and then some grit (I was worried about this last one, but was assured it would be okay) to shift them. No luck. I then remembered my father telling me about the legendary cleaning powers of Coca Cola on 2 penny piece, so with three hours to go before the guests were due to arrive, I invested in a 2 litre bottle (as I don't drink it usually) and filled it up. Sure enough, when I emptied it out to clean it before opening the first of many bottles, all the crystals were gone and the decanter was truly clean!

Pretty cool, huh?

Mark
 
Text and images Mark Hill
www.markhillpublishing.com

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Offline Pinkspoons

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Re: Cleaning decanters
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2007, 09:57:58 PM »
It's the phosphoric acid in the cola that does it. I use catering quality phosphoric (available in crystaline form) to dissolve rust when I'm restoring metalwork. It's amazing stuff - and you can safely tip it down the drain when you're all done.  :)

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Offline MarkHill

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Re: Cleaning decanters
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2007, 11:01:36 PM »
Thanks Nic, I didn't know that. Just imagine what that does to one's stomach!
Mark
Text and images Mark Hill
www.markhillpublishing.com

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Offline Pip

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Re: Cleaning decanters
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2007, 03:44:09 PM »
Of all the zillions of things hubby and I have used to try to shift stuff from inside vases and decanters we hadn't thought of trying coca-cola - cheers for that Mark I'm going to fill a few things up tonight and see how I get on!

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Offline Elmwood

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Re: Cleaning decanters
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2009, 09:34:16 AM »
Hello Mark,

Having recently acquired another bargain find at  a car boot  for 50p ..... Would you be kind enough to confirm that it is indeed an FT188 Directors Decanter as per Dartington book page 74.  I think my one has a more pronounced air bubble similar to an elongated teardrop.

I was looking at this particular post because whilst it WAS in very clean condition, I wanted it sparkling, and have made it worse as the residue of the denture tablets has marked the inside. After rinsing with clear water, I dried it with a hairdyer, but there is still some dullness inside.  My last resort is going to be your coke method SO -

1. How long do I leave the coke in the bottle?
2. After rinsing out what is the best method to dry?

After recently acquiring the Dartington Glass book and dvd,  I now feel I cannot part with the decanter, and have a newfound respect for such an inspirational and creative man.


Regards Sharron






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Offline Deb of Oz

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Re: Cleaning decanters
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2009, 01:30:13 PM »
You can clean grease off a driveway with coca cola. Never thought to fill glass or people I liked with the stuff.

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Offline Pinkspoons

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Re: Cleaning decanters
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2009, 01:48:52 PM »
2. After rinsing out what is the best method to dry?

Find a secure way of leaving the decanter turned upside-down so that all the water can run out. Failing this, roll up some kitchen paper into a long tube, secure it with a little tape in the middle, and pop it in - it will draw up the moisture as it evaporates so that you don't get condensation within the decanter. Rolled newspaper works for larger vases.

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Offline Andy

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Re: Cleaning decanters
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2009, 03:20:33 PM »
For some reason, i always think there must be an easy way to clean a decanter, ive got a couple on the go
at the moment, i made the mistake of putting Domestos Bleach (chlorine) in them , i believe this just stains
the marks whiter still, so recently, every time im in a Homebase or hardware store, i check the shelves,
ive tried stuff with Formic acid, (kilrock descaler) citric acid, Hydrochloric acid (alloy wheel cleaner) Limelite,
Cillit Bang, Mr muscle.  Last year i mixed a few together and nearly knocked myself out  :sleep:
Im sure i am going to hit on something that works one day. ( I invented Gold the other day!  :D )

Ive just bought some coke, and will see if it makes any difference.

I agree with Nic, best way to dry is rolled up kitchen towels, it dries them overnight.  :thup:
And then the white marks appear again >:(

One day i hope to find the answer!
Cheers
Andy
"Born to lose, Live to win." Ian (Lemmy) Kilmister Motorhead (1945-????)

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Offline Pinkspoons

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Re: Cleaning decanters
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2009, 04:02:43 PM »
What you're talking about sounds like water damage rather than simple limescale:

http://www.great-glass.co.uk/glass%20notes/clean2.htm#STAIN

I wouldn't try mixing acids yourself, though!

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Offline Andy

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Re: Cleaning decanters
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2009, 04:29:29 PM »
Nic,
the damage in the ones im working on i dont think is etched on, im sure it wasnt bad before i
bleached it! Its sort of blotchy, all over, right to the top where the bleach went.

I must remember not to use bleach, but i have an awful memory and will probably make same mistake
next time!  ::)

Cheers
Andy
( i know the only really good acid for cleaning glass is hydrofloric acid which is deadly ! theres a great video somewhere of Stourbridge Crystal makers, happily dipping glass in a bath of the stuff without any protection!!
cant remember where ive seen it! )
"Born to lose, Live to win." Ian (Lemmy) Kilmister Motorhead (1945-????)

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