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Author Topic: Any ideas about this (possibly) Art Deco vase/trough?  (Read 2215 times)

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Offline Anne

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Re: Any ideas about this (possibly) Art Deco vase/trough?
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2008, 04:46:46 PM »
Adam, I'm constantly astonished at how much you can pull from the depths of your memory. :)  Armed with your pattern number I searched Glen's Sowerby catalogues on CD (vol 2) and found the 2617 pattern, which looks very similar to John's except that the 2617 has vertical ribbing on the sides whereas John's is frosted panels like on the front. The catalogue gives the Sowerby dimensions as 8¾" x 4¾" x 5½" so is a similar size to John's. I can't find John's exact design on the Sowerby catalogue CD. Perhaps either Adam or Glen can add more info. 

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Offline Glen

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Re: Any ideas about this (possibly) Art Deco vase/trough?
« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2008, 05:29:05 PM »
I did look at this query back in December, and I went through pretty much the same thought process that is set out above. Yes, it does look like the 2617 posy trough, but there are significant differences, as has been pointed out. So I didn't post back then, as I didn't have the answer (or so I thought) and I hoped someone else may have  :)

The more I research European (Carnival) glass, the more I realise how many pattern look-alikes and copies there are. I suspect that's what we might have here. And do you remember this one too?
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,10273.msg81761.html#msg81761

Maybe this trough is Sowerby. But maybe it isn't. Perhaps it's a close copy by another maker.

GT
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Offline Adam

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Re: Any ideas about this (possibly) Art Deco vase/trough?
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2008, 02:34:49 PM »
Anne - I can't take credit for thinking of the number 2617 - it came from Christine.  I simply thought it sounded plausible for an Art Deco type item, all Sowerbys number being chronological. My memory on this one is very hazy and I haven't a (first hand) clue as to the actual number.  I'm not even 100% sure I've seen one in the flesh. 

Marcus - As a naiive (sp?), young newcomer I simply accepted that the area was called "The Painters".  It was probably a few years later that the penny dropped that it probably referred to painting things like the panels on the subject of this thread with a hydrofluoric acid/flour concoction and not simply painting the offices or factory railings!  Remember that at that stage I hadn't seen any acid processing - that came later at Davidsons, and I didn't have much to do with it even there.  As a thoroughly nasty process it was done (Davidsons) at the far end of the site where the effluent could go straight into a tributary of the Tyne!

Adam D.


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Offline Frank

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Re: Any ideas about this (possibly) Art Deco vase/trough?
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2008, 02:46:06 PM »
It is surely safer, quicker and cheaper to paint on resist and dunk in an acid tank.

I recall someone experimenting with etching and they found it much easier to paint resist on - painting with an acid paste being very difficult and only suited to bordered areas as inevitably there was spread.

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