Author Topic: Thames bridge and buildings  (Read 1825 times)

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Offline David E

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Re: Thames bridge and buildings
« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2007, 02:51:31 PM »
I see what you mean about the Thames Plate works. Incidentally, Chance was prohibited from gaining medals at the Great Exhibition due to their massive involvement with the construction of the edifice.

Also from the british-history.ac.uk web site:

Quote from: Thames Plate Glass Company
For the Great Exhibition of 1851 the company manufactured the largest sheets of plate-glass hitherto produced, but the claim, sometimes advanced, that the company also made glass for the Crystal Palace itself is incorrect: this was produced by the Birmingham firm of Chance Brothers

Which echos what I was referring to.

Strange indeed with that web site. Probably worth going back to the root directory:

http://www.digitalpresence.com/histarch/

Who needs menus! >:D Note to web designers: always include an index page in each directory ::)
David
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Offline David E

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Re: Thames bridge and buildings
« Reply #11 on: December 14, 2007, 03:38:57 PM »
I also meant to query this possibly misleading comment:
Quote
Cast plate-glass had been invented in France in the seventeenth century. In Britain a factory producing cast plate-glass opened at Ravenhead, near St Helens, in 1773, but the heavy excise duty on glass inhibited the growth of the industry, and by the 1830s there were only two factories, both in the north, at Ravenhead and Newcastle upon Tyne. (ref. 138 - see below)

Ravenhead refers to Pilkingtons (from 1826) although I'm not sure of the Newcastle company. But what about Chance? It was producing plate glass during this time and had even patented a method. The following is from my proposed second volume on the company:

Quote from: Chance Reflections
In May 1841 Chance Brothers were producing 4,000 feet of plate glass per week and further extensions to the buildings were undertaken, along with the ordering of forty-eight new grinders in 1842...

I'll check back to see when it started manufacture of plate glass, but perhaps this report refers to cast-plate, as opposed to any other form? Rather specific, if it does.

Ref. 138: A History of Technology, ed. C.Singer et al., vol.IV, 1958, p.368: H.J.Powell, Glass Making in England, 1923, p.123: 13th Report of the Commissioners of Enquiry into the Excise Establishment...Glass, 1835, pp.40,42: Hentie Louw, 'Window-Glass Making in Britain c.1660—c.1860 and its Architectural Impact', Construction History, vol.7, 1991, pp.47–68.
David
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Contact ► Cortex Design ◄ to order any book


Offline David E

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Re: Thames bridge and buildings
« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2007, 03:53:00 PM »
Ah, just found this:

Quote from: Showell's Dictionary of Birmingham
The "patent plate" was the invention of Mr. James Chance, and Chance Brothers (of whose works a notice will be found in another part of this book) are the only manufacturers in this country of glass for lighthouse purposes.

James Chance invented this whilst studying at Cambridge, so predating when he started at Chance in 1838.
David
► The Curious History of the Bulb Vase ◄
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Offline Frank

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Re: Thames bridge and buildings
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2007, 04:03:47 PM »
I did say about that article
Quote
this is a reasonably comprehensive 'looking' report
as I had my doubts about it over-all. The Swinburne piece claims that he filed a patent in 1855, well it was not in Class 56 - Glass - I am currently digitising all the Class 56 abstracts from 1855-1900 for the Glass-Study and Swinburne does not show until 1861, Chance are scattered throughout. I recently hit another patent discrepancy but Sid knew the correct number/date for that one. So always treat such date statements with caution until the original has been located.
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Offline Anne

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Re: Thames bridge and buildings
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2007, 09:42:00 PM »
Strange indeed with that web site. Probably worth going back to the root directory:

http://www.digitalpresence.com/histarch/

Who needs menus! >:D Note to web designers: always include an index page in each directory ::)

Again, indicates a poorly set-up webserver, as there is a setting in Apache config which allows or disallows directory listing. If disallowed then you don't even need an index page as the server returns a default blocking page. If allowed and you don't have an index page then you see the directory contents as here.


Offline Frank

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Re: Thames bridge and buildings
« Reply #15 on: May 26, 2013, 12:35:19 PM »
Did come across a reference to Thames Glassworks Co. 1865-66 in Connecticut (run by by William Barry and Nathan S. Fish.) which seems a little early for above disappearance or perhaps they had started the business earlier.... but then what happened after 1866? Move to Illinois? Can those names be connected to the London company? http://www.glassmuseum.org/glassworks8.htm
Frank A.
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