No-one likes general adverts, and ours hadn't been updated for ages, so we're having a clear-out and a change round to make the new ones useful to you. These new adverts bring in a small amount to help pay for the board and keep it free for you to use, so please do use them whenever you can, Let our links help you find great books on glass or a new piece for your collection. Thank you for supporting the Board.

Author Topic: Would this be pasta glass?  (Read 1874 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline KevinH

  • Global Moderator
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 5480
    • England
Re: Would this be pasta glass?
« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2008, 04:19:47 PM »
It would be unusual for a clear dome to be formed with wreathing through choice or design so that the interior elements cannot be clearly seen from the top. Maybe Adam A. or another glassworker could say how simple or hard it is to include wreathing as a design feature?

KevinH

Offline Laura Friedman

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 231
    • http://planetglass.net
Re: Would this be pasta glass?
« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2008, 04:20:28 PM »
I'm not sure if the term "pasta glass" was used in Murano, or if it is a term used by collectors.

It refers to opaque glass that is not cased under clear. If you look closely, you'll see that almost all Murano glass is cased inside a clear layer - sometimes this layer is extremely thin, but it's what makes the glass shiny. With pasta glass, the glass takes on a dull look that resembles cooke, dry spaghetti, hence the name.  I think you see it best in the picture of Javier's figurine, as with my vase, only the blue bands are pasta - the white portions are cased in clear.

Usually you see this technique in circa 1920s and 30s items.

Offline Leni

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 2274
Re: Would this be pasta glass?
« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2008, 04:24:39 PM »
I'm not sure if the term "pasta glass" was used in Murano, or if it is a term used by collectors.
But in the link I posted, Venetian bead makers are using the term - see post above.
Leni

Offline Lustrousstone

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 12195
  • Gender: Female
    • Warrington, UK
    • My Gallery
Re: Would this be pasta glass?
« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2008, 08:13:11 PM »
Could pasta glass be a sort of pate de verre?

Offline Leni

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 2274
Re: Would this be pasta glass?
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2008, 08:37:48 PM »
I reckon that could well be it, Christine!   :hiclp:
Leni

Offline TxSilver

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 2810
  • Gender: Female
    • San Marcos Art Glass
Re: Would this be pasta glass?
« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2008, 09:41:01 PM »
I found a definition of pasta vitrea on the Fossilfly site, http://www.fossilfly.com/Murano_Glass_Glossary.htm. The definition is that it is a difficult technique where an opaque colored glass is made by adding clear or colored crystals to molten glass. I read on artofvenice that the glass has the appearance of ceramic.

Anita
Anita
San Marcos Art Glass
Visit the Murano Zoo
http://sites.google.com/site/muranozoo/

Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9396
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
Re: Would this be pasta glass?
« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2008, 01:05:14 PM »
If the glass looks like ceramic then it is because the enamels are marvered into the surface. In Monart we collectors coined the term 'Surface-decorated' to distinguish it from clear cased enamels.

Here is a raspberry and two dark coloured examples these have also been lustred.

If less reheating is used an gritty, almost sandpaper-like, quality of texture can be achieved.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech

Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9396
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
Re: Would this be pasta glass?
« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2008, 01:09:23 PM »
The surface pitting is achieved by mixing charcoal or some similar vaporisable material with the enamel on the marver. As it gets to a high enough temperature small bubbles or voids are created.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech

Offline TxSilver

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 2810
  • Gender: Female
    • San Marcos Art Glass
Re: Would this be pasta glass?
« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2008, 02:49:36 PM »
I think we can say that it is not pasta glass. It looks more like paper mache than it does ceramic. It may be a thin layer of colored lattimo on the framework of the weight. I was thrown off by the word pasta and thought it may be glass that was applied like, or looked pasty.

Anita
Anita
San Marcos Art Glass
Visit the Murano Zoo
http://sites.google.com/site/muranozoo/

Offline Artofvenice

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 212
    • http://www.artofvenice.com
Re: Would this be pasta glass?
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2008, 01:37:22 PM »
Here a definition of Pasta Vitrea:
" Opaque coloured glass with a ceramiclike consistency, obtained by mixing large quantities of pigments followed by micro particles of white opal and/or pigmented molted mixture."
Concerning the "Pasta", no it isn't related with that kind of pasta (to eat).

Sincerely

Alex

www.artofvenice.com

 

Look for glass on
 ebay.co.uk 
Look for glass on
 eBay.com (US)

Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum


This Website is provided by Angela Bowey, PO Box 113, Paihia 0247, New Zealand