No-one likes general adverts, and ours hadn't been updated for ages, so we're having a clear-out and a change round to make the new ones useful to you. These new adverts bring in a small amount to help pay for the board and keep it free for you to use, so please do use them whenever you can, Let our links help you find great books on glass or a new piece for your collection. Thank you for supporting the Board.

Author Topic: Non-monart glass identification  (Read 1345 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline cfosterk

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 273
Non-monart glass identification
« on: January 30, 2008, 04:28:32 PM »
I wonder if there are any sites that are any good for identifying UK glass. Monart is reasonably well covered!!

Always finding swirling glass designs and bubble decorated pieces which are very cheap but absolutely no idea who made them!!

Any help would be appreciated!

Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9418
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Europe
    • Gateway
Re: Non-monart glass identification
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2008, 05:29:39 PM »
Lots of Monart bubble pass unnoticed. Peter Holmes does 'Ysart Style' but with a fairly distinctive appearance and mostly signed. Lots of English companies too. Great Glass is a good site, although pics are a bit small. No-one seems to be producing sites with the comprehensiveness apart from Davidson and Whitefriars.

check out

http://www.great-glass.co.uk/
http://www.glassencyclopedia.com/
http://www.cloudglass.com/
http://www.1st-glass.1st-things.com

Offline cfosterk

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 273
Re: Non-monart glass identification
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2008, 11:45:15 AM »
Thanks Frank - most of the stuff I see is described as Whitefriars (or in the style of) or Scottish art glass - whatever that is!!

I'm suprised as I can tell the difference between most of the premier league manufacturers of C20th - it's the uni-coloured and bi-coloured pieces of 'unknown' origin to me!!

Must get some more books on glass!!!!

Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9418
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Europe
    • Gateway
Re: Non-monart glass identification
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2008, 12:39:01 PM »
You probably won't find them in many books yet either. But if you do... please shout.

Then there are those being made, or sold by a dealer, to pass of as Ysart http://www.ysartglass.com/Ysart/Fake%20Ysart%20Glassware.htm

And some of the lookalikes:
http://www.ysartglass.com/Ysart/NotYsart.htm

I came across some comments on another glass site recently that tried to argue that the ones on shown as Bohemia/Stourbridge? or Cellophane glass are indeed Monart and it is only because Frank Andrews 'pronounces' that they are not that they don't get bought by collectors.
 :huh: I pronounce  :spls: Hmmm! How can I pronounce when all my sites are so obviously open to peer review and public debate. They are obviously people with zero knowledge of free hand-blown glass, Monart styles, techniques, methods or colours. Yet it also disturbing that even today people want things that are so clearly not to be something else, so better to criticise the research of dozens of people using one name as a target.

If it is not obvious that I am open to discussion people should try instead of sowing malicious doubt - I do not own probably 90% of the research that went into Ysart Glass and the list is long. Some of the names will be found as authors on both Ysartglass and Scotland's Glass others on the lists of contributors.
http://www.ysartglass.com/Contributors.htm
http://www.scotlandsglass.co.uk/cms/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=11&Itemid=25
In addition to 100 members of the collectors club during the 1990's, most of whome contributed information.
Neither list is up to date.
Additionally since being on the web a lot of relatives of glassmakers referenced have been in touch adding to or correcting information about their family. The Ysartglass site represents the state of knowledge, with the exception of later research (Glass Association Journal and Perth Conference 2005) by Ian Turner.

Further, the naive view that anything with two colours IS Monart still persists - yet until the 90's, 99% of Monart in auction was described as Schneider. Monart that does not match the catalogues is extremely rare and mostly traceable as a personal gift to friends of the Ysart's.

Yet there is also a lot of glass decorated in a similar technique which we are still unable to attribute to country, let alone factory. The point being that Monart has been well researched with a lot of input of first hand knowledge, most of which has been confirmed through second or more avenues of research. Despite which myths are still being perpetuated and even created, sadly often with an eye to financial gain.

I suppose the reason few other sites go to such a depth is simply time. I have had the unique opportunity of being given the time, through personal misfortune, to spend on building these sites and facilitating a channel for that research to be brought into the open. I can spend up to 12 hours or more working on the sites and have done so with few breaks for eight years now. Many others have contributed hundreds of hours too.

One of the things that I am trying to achieve with Scotland's Glass is to ensure not only that more sharers get credit and sources are quoted, but that some of these people can actively work on the site content. Controls only being implemented to ensure editorial integrity. The field is so large that my own involvement should become balanced by the number of people actively involved and thus less a target for personalisation of criticism. The Caithness catalogues are being digitised mostly by other people, currently I do all the adding on line and some of the image work. The several thousand images still waiting to go on are the input of dozens more. The effort is helped by collectors, dealers and other researchers.

[sorry to use your thread for that little rant, it is not completely related your question  :-[]

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk

Look for glass on ebay.co.uk  Look for glass on eBay.com (US)
Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum


This Website is provided by Angela Bowey, PO Box 113, Paihia 0247, New Zealand