Author Topic: future glass antiques  (Read 4893 times)

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Offline chopin-liszt

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« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2005, 12:19:05 PM »
:D I know those apple dishes, Leni!
 I found out they're French, Arcoroc.
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.


Offline Frank

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« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2005, 02:10:45 PM »
Oven to table and fridge to table are vital in ouir modern age, square with near- straight sides is good for space in ever more cramped fridges - but NO plastic lids please!

The lids could double as plates. Although not so good for when the leftovers

Lots of colour at the edges at least and perhaps some aventurine too (Monart serving dishes :lol: )

Sets of four all the same size would be great, one always has to buy sets in 3 different sizes and while the stack ok, one invariably wants three of the bigger size or three of the smaller size... sets of four would be better for fridge sets.
Frank A.
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Offline Anne

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« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2005, 08:03:01 PM »
Agree with Frank, no plastic lids please. :) I also agree that same size sets are good. I have nested sets of dishes of which I hardly ever use the smaller ones, but always need extras of the bigger ones.  :roll:


Offline Anne

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« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2005, 08:16:45 PM »
Quote from: "Leni"
I agree about colours clashing with food, but I prefer coloured to plain glass, except when it's textured glass.   :roll:  So how about a coloured rim or a bit of colour somewhere, just not too much so it distracts from what's in the dishes?   :D Leni


I love coloured glass as well Leni, I just am not too keen on bright colours clashing with the contents. :lol:  Plain clear glass has its place, but can be a tad boring. Some of my favourite serving dishes are the blue Pyrex type ones, which don't seem clash with anything. They're also a good size and hold enough to feed hungry teenagers!!! :)

Quote from: "Leni"

Divided dishes are good, but they tend to be either oval or oblong - boring!  :roll:  How about a different shape?  Leni


Flower shaped? Circular with apses where the petals are, if you follow what I mean. Much more interesting than plain round or oval ones.


Offline chopin-liszt

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« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2005, 12:59:12 AM »
:D Hello again,

Personally, I don't like silly shapes for eating from. Food seems to stay better on round plates, (maybe I'm just a messy eater :oops: ) but you said it was serving dishes you were to design!

One thought I've had is that more and more people are using very big deep bowls, which are extremely useful for all sorts of things. Bowls deeper than pasta bowls and holding a bit more than pasta bowls - something along the lines of Chinese rice bowls, that would hold a whole meal in them. I think more and more people are doing stir-fry stuff, and these big bowls are good for that, but they could also be used as serving dishes.

I actually use all three sizes of bowls and all three sizes of flat plates of my service, all the time. It's the serving dishes that I don't use so often, but then, there are only the two of us, so I just serve everything straight onto our plates. :D

:twisted: You're going to have to get a big bit of paper and some coloured pencils and try to make some sort of sense out of all these ideas! :twisted: :wink:
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.


Offline Jo in Australia

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« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2005, 01:14:03 AM »
I'd quite like a big platter for serving antipasto. I'd like one that had ripples rather than deep divisions... so that it would look good even if there wasn't a lot of food on it, but the different flavours would be kept separate. Colour-wise I think it could be a bit adventurous because a serving plate can be more of a feature than the plates you eat off.
I love the idea of it having Monart colours... or WMF... or...  :)
Jo
o


Offline Bernard C

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« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2005, 03:46:23 AM »
Bill — I have two suggestions.

1. Washupability.

We have several badly designed items in our kitchen that cause us considerable aggravation as they are impossible to leave to dry without producing limescale rings somewhere.   Whatever you design, I suggest that you test it on a flat surface and a draining rack to see if you can place it in such a way that all the rinsing water drains off it.   If you can't, I suggest you redesign it.

2. Retail v. Catering Suppliers.

I have little confidence in the ability of the great British public to choose tableware, and I am sure that applies to the public in many other countries.   Accordingly I suggest you initially ignore retailers and concentrate on commercial catering trade suppliers for basic shape and size ideas.    At least you can be sure that these designs actually work!

You can then add your own individual design and style to the basics.

I hope that helps.

Bernard C.  8)
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Offline Anne

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« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2005, 08:21:51 AM »
But that's far better than no response at all Peter!  :lol:


Offline chopin-liszt

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« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2005, 08:43:36 AM »
:lol:
First, Bill has to take each idea, which gets put as a heading, with a list of pro's and con's for each, in order to weigh up it's validity, then he is going to need a large sheet of paper and some coloured crayons to make diagrams, with the ideas in boxes, and arrows pointing between them in order to make sense of it all. It's called brainstorming. I'm sure very useful information will come out of it all. Not only that, but it's really good fun to do! :D
More ideas are needed!!
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.


Offline Frank

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« Reply #19 on: July 19, 2005, 11:01:04 AM »
How about square straight sided bowls in the form of interlocking jigsaw puzzle pieces with variations, 3 prongs - 1 hole, 2 prongs - 2 holes, ditto prongs at right angles, 3 holes 1 prong, 4 holes... etc.

Then a wall bracket with two downward pointing prongs and an up hole.

The bowls are then hung from the bracket and you can always take one off without disturbing the others. Sell as sets of six with bracket.

Each a different colour and it is up to the purchaser to use as a sculpture or serving bowls :D
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
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