Author Topic: Carnival bowl,  (Read 1208 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Gilead

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 552
Carnival bowl,
« on: March 12, 2008, 07:15:22 PM »
Hi
   Could this carnival bowl be American? and is this iridescent colour orange or marigold, how about Fenton? or Davidson, or none of them can any one tell by the pattern which look like a flower inside a star, stands 4.1/2ins high, the  base is 3.1/2 ins diameter, what year about would you say 1930s maybe?
                             thanks
                               steve


Online Lustrousstone

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 11047
  • Gender: Female
    • Warrington, UK
    • My Gallery
Re: Carnival bowl,
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2008, 07:52:45 PM »
I think it's European carnival not American so therefore not Fenton. The colour is marigold, this sort of colour is always marigold. It's definitely not Davidson, they didn't make any carnival. I'll go for a root now and see if I can work out who.

Can't find it, or more likely can't see it  :(


Offline Gilead

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 552
Re: Carnival bowl,
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2008, 08:23:35 PM »
Cheers Christine,
                       Many thanks, was just reading thatprodution of carnival waned in the us in the mid 1920s and manufactures in europe, Scandinavia, and Argentina began to produce their own carnival glass, to supply their home markets and this was called secondary carnival was still hand pressed but with less finishing and was made untill late 1930s.

In Britain, Sowerby's glassworks and George davidson reused 19th century pressed-glass moulds to produce smaller ranges in marigold, blue and amethyst,


Online Lustrousstone

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 11047
  • Gender: Female
    • Warrington, UK
    • My Gallery
Re: Carnival bowl,
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2008, 08:36:26 PM »
Sowerby made carnival, Davidson did not


Offline Glen

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 2889
  • Gender: Female
    • Carnival Glass Research and Writing
Re: Carnival bowl,
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2008, 08:53:30 PM »
I have seen a similar item before - also in marigold - but I am not certain of the maker. It is rather close in  its design concept to a Brockwitz (Germany) comport known as "Charlotte".
http://www.geocities.com/carni_glass_uk_2000/MoreBrockwitz.html

I'm not sure where you got the info from about Carnival that you quoted, Steve, but it's inaccurate and misleading, although bits of it are correct. What was the source?

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood

Offline Gilead

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 552
Re: Carnival bowl,
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2008, 09:01:20 PM »
Glen the source was 20th-century glass, by JM,

Offline Mosquito

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 855
  • Gender: Male
    • 中国 (China)
    • Jobling Art Glass
Re: Carnival bowl,
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2008, 09:06:42 PM »
Quote
the source was 20th-century glass, by JM,

 ::)

Offline Glen

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 2889
  • Gender: Female
    • Carnival Glass Research and Writing
Re: Carnival bowl,
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2008, 09:26:55 PM »
Thanks for the source. It's not very sound and as I noted, very misleading. My comments on the quote from the book are in red:

...that prodution of carnival waned in the us in the mid 1920s (fair comment) and manufactures in europe, Scandinavia, and Argentina (and Australia, India, Mexico, Poland etc) began to produce their own carnival glass, to supply their home markets (the implied date is too late plus they also exported lots of it) and this was called secondary carnival (nobody calls it secondary carnival) was still hand pressed (or blow moulded) but with less finishing (not necessarily) and was made untill late 1930s (wrong on many levels).

In Britain, Sowerby's glassworks and George davidson (no no no to Davidson) reused 19th century pressed-glass moulds (only part of the big picture) to produce smaller ranges (smaller than what?) in marigold, blue (rare rare rare)and amethyst (and vaseline and black amethyst).

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood

Offline Gilead

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 552
Re: Carnival bowl,
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2008, 09:39:45 PM »
Cheers Glen
                will have to find a better book to get reference from but all a learning curve for me, as a newbie, to glass collecting,

Online Lustrousstone

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 11047
  • Gender: Female
    • Warrington, UK
    • My Gallery
Re: Carnival bowl,
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2008, 09:52:03 PM »
Oh good. I haven't missed it - having been through my (Glen's) books. Charlotte was the closest I came to as well

 

Search
eBay.com
eBay.co.uk

Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum
Enter
key words
to search
Amazon.com
This Website is provided by Angela Bowey, PO Box 113, Paihia 0247, New Zealand