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Author Topic: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.  (Read 1701 times)

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Offline Frank

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S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« on: March 31, 2008, 05:10:59 PM »
Last couple of pages of the catalogue going in now and plenty more surprises.

What distinguished a Pickle Jar a Chutney Jar and a Preserve Jar . I presume it is size, unfortunately the catalogue gives no sizes for these standard tableware items. None of the S&W preserve jars show a ground top.

What pickle would need a lip and handle though

But this was a surprise: Cut Preserve Nappie I cannot find a root for this term in this usage?

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Offline David E

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2008, 05:17:28 PM »
Quote
What pickle would need a lip and handle though

To drain off excess fluid? Or perhaps the 'pickle' in those days was a runny sauce.

Charles could help with your queries, but he is exceptionally busy ATM.
David
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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2008, 06:35:32 PM »
The jug pickle I can see, all that lovely oniony vinegar for dribbling on your chips. Nappie is usually used for handled thingys, not ones on pedestals  :huh:

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Offline krsilber

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2008, 09:10:27 PM »
Seems like S&W commonly used some of their own terminology and spellling for things.  Marketing ploys, perhaps, to stretch out popular lines.  The preserve looks more like a serving item, with its more delicate finial (though I suppose anything cut would be a serving item).  Perhaps it also had a slot in the lid for a spoon.  Preserves here don't usually have ground necks.

Without sizes it's pretty hard to judge.  I like this theory, "Or perhaps the 'pickle' in those days was a runny sauce."  I picture what we in the US today call a relish, or pickled relish.
Kristi


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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2008, 06:31:02 AM »
Pickle in the UK means anything preserved in vinegar, which may or may not be spiced, from whole eggs and onions to cucumbers, gherkins and other vegetables (which are either cooked, blanched or raw and then put into vinegar), to various fruits and vegetables chopped up and cooked in the vinegar with sugar and spices (what I think you mean by relish and what we should probably call a chutney). Preserve is a jam (jelly) or marmalade.

When you think about Frank's jars and their possible contents, it starts to make sense. Chopped up squishy stuff in the narrow chutney, whole or bulky things in the fatter pickles (those with tasty vinegar in one with a spout). Here the ground tops keep the vinegar smell in. Preserve in a covered jar to keep the dust out or on the compote (nappie). These were all for serving - not for preserving. Of course it was a marketing ploy. Why sell someone one all-purpose pickle jar for all pickles when they might buy three different ones.

When you think about it how many sizes or plate do you really need? Most of us have more than one!


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Offline Glen

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2008, 07:09:32 AM »
The term "nappy" is one that has absorbed ( ;D) Carnival Glass collectors for years. It is usually used to describe a small dish, that may or may not, have one handle (if it does, it is usually called a handled nappy). It can be collar based or pedestal based. The name nappie / nappy can be seen in catalogues (eg Crown Crystal). I've heard various theories regarding the origin / root.

http://www.geocities.com/carni_glass_uk_2000/cartoonNappy.html
 ;D
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Offline Frank

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2008, 08:19:06 AM »
Intriguing that the term Nappie is not covered by dictionaries when it is not such a new term. Is see the spell checker suggest 'Nappies' or 'Nap Pie'. ;)

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Offline Jay

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2008, 10:01:15 AM »
Possibly... the jam will have a slotted lid for the spoon, whereas it's not 'etiquette' to leave a spoon in chutney!
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Offline Frank

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2008, 10:09:39 AM »
None of these appear to have a slotted lid. As a child when these things were still in use at home they did not have slotted lids either, we used a knife not a spoon. Hotel jam pots did have a slot and spoon though.

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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2008, 11:27:16 AM »
Nappie is still current US terminology, see here for all the sizes and all the colours

And see here for origin (source www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary)
Nappy, plural nappies
Etymology: English dialect nap bowl, from Middle English, from Old English hnaepp; akin to Old High German hnapf bowl
Date: circa 1864 – a rimless shallow open serving dish

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