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Author Topic: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.  (Read 1700 times)

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Offline Frank

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2008, 11:32:17 AM »
Excellent detective work  ;D

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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2008, 11:36:28 AM »
And nappy and nappie would just be spelling variants

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Offline Glen

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2008, 12:45:14 PM »
Nice one, Christine  :clap:
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see http://www.carnivalglassworldwide.com/
Copyright G&S Thistlewood

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Offline Anne

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2008, 11:36:07 PM »
Possibly... the jam will have a slotted lid for the spoon, whereas it's not 'etiquette' to leave a spoon in chutney!

It's not just an etiquette thing Jay. Some pickles will actually damage a spoon if left in it - somewhere we have a spoon with a part of its coating missing where it was left in a vinegar-based pickle - it literally stripped off the surface.  :o (Think what it does to your insides then!!!  >:D)

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Offline Jay

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2008, 07:33:25 AM »
Yes, I'm a nicely brought up boy who knows these things! and is entrusted with the family silver (-plate).

It reminds me how obscure this type of info is becoming!

As I'm developing texts for my site I'm constantly aware of the role these things play in glass design. Whilst they might be known to glass collectors, the younger crowd have no idea about the manners of the past.

Things we might need to remind younger glass collectors, include;

Until the war most people in most countries were still buying their basic foodstuffs in a 'plain brown wrapper' or small paper bag
It was considered 'uncivilised' to put commercial wrappings on the table, so many things like (sugar and milk) needed to be moved to a 'presentation' container, even cigarettes were placed in a beaker or box before being offered to guests.
Likewise many foods were presented in a large bowl with smaller individual bowls for each person. Not only cakes, but also bonbons, biscuits and peanuts/snacks. Wines and spirits were transferred to decanters partly for similar reasons.

E.g. Recently I found what I assumed was a flower frog for three stems, but turns out to be a 'cigarette stand'!

The serving sizes for most things have increased a lot, and glasses, plates etc. have tended to get bigger accordingly. The earlier the stemware is often less practical in use because of modern serving sizes.

After the war, butter packaging changed (in Holland) and instead of round pats, was sold in the square blocks we get today. This meant redesign for butter dishes!

The dutch used to serve 'bowl', an odd concoction of (tinned/fresh) fruits, sauces, wine(?) and custards etc. which came in a large vessel with small cups and a ladle. Since this delicious(?) delicacy died in the 50's (condemned as poverty food) it has become lost in social history. If you are under 30 you will never understand why people did it, or what the object is for! LOL!

Do you have any more ideas for these sorts of pointers which need to be noted for history before all civilized table manners disappear?

Sorry mods; this is probably wandering 'off topic'.




Dutch 20th Century Factory Glass

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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2008, 09:49:00 AM »
Just think of all that washing up... :o

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Offline Anne

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2008, 03:00:49 PM »
Finger bowls for the better-off and knife rests and individual salts - all long-since gone from our tables. Napkin rings for proper cloth napkins (not paper serviettes. ) All this could be called the Social History of Glass I suppose Jay.

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Offline Carolyn Preston

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Re: S&W terminology Jars and a nappie.
« Reply #17 on: April 03, 2008, 01:11:48 AM »
If I might continue the wibble a bit longer, my mother had two lovely salts with a blue glass insert and silver (real tarnishable) outsides. Lost, unfortunately, to the wicked witch of the west (step-mother). Lost and gone forever.

Carolyn

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