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What does "intaglio" mean in the UK?

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krsilber:
I get the distinct impression that "intaglio" has different connotations across the pond than it does in the US.  Would someone please define it for me?

Glen:
Well, I am "across the pond" (i.e. in the UK)- and the meaning of intaglio (and the context in which I use it) is where it refers to a design that lies below (looks "cut-into" or incised) the surface of the glass, on (press) moulded items. The opposite of this is cameo (where the design is proud / above the surface of the glass).

That's how I and my fellow Carnival Glass collectors around the world use it; this particular interpretation isn't based on location / geography.

However, I think you might find this webpage interesting. It appears to be a 1903 document about the (UK)Stourbridge company, Stevens and Williams. For a definition of their "Intaglio Glass" scroll down about two thirds of the way.

http://www.tom.cockeram.clara.net/Industry/190304sw.htm

Glen

Frank:
As I understand it Intaglio is cutting with a small wheel, allowing greater flexibility and importantly, lower cost. I believe it was developed in the US and only adopted by UK companies as the perceived superior American cut hurt English sales.

josordoni:
As a general term it is of course, also used for all sorts of things, i.e. jewellery, furniture, silver, printing, even, believe it or not, burial mounds..... 

In overall terminological terms,  it is,  as Glen says, something that is created so that the image is below the level of the surrounding material. 

the word is Italian of course, and means "incised"

I thought this a good description from http://seeing.nypl.org/intaglio.html regarding the use of the term in printing:

Intaglio (Italian, "to incise") includes engraving, etching, and mezzotint, among other techniques. Reversing the relief process, in intaglio the artist cuts the lines to be printed, rather than cutting away the nonprinting surfaces. Although it is an ancient process, intaglio did not come into use in Europe for printing illustrations until the fifteenth century. Engraving allowed the scientific or medical artist to create a more precise and detailed line in a metal plate — copper at first, but later steel — than was possible in relief. Intaglio printing requires much more pressure than relief, since the ink is held in recessed grooves instead of on the surface of the plate, and so illustrations could not be printed on the same press as the text.

Frank:

--- Quote from: Glen on April 05, 2008, 07:23:39 AM ---However, I think you might find this webpage interesting. It appears to be a 1903 document about the (UK)Stourbridge company, Stevens and Williams. For a definition of their "Intaglio Glass" scroll down about two thirds of the way.
http://www.tom.cockeram.clara.net/Industry/190304sw.htm

--- End quote ---

Glen do you know where that account came from?

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