Author Topic: A Sowerby plinth story with a twist in the tale!  (Read 1978 times)

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Offline Bernard C

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Re: A Sowerby plinth story with a twist in the tale!
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2008, 11:40:16 AM »
Quote from: Tony H
...   I was hopefull it was a new stamp collector!!   ...

Sorry, Tony, I'm an old stamp collector β€” I gave up over 40 years ago!   I quite enjoyed browsing around your current offerings, many of which were familiar to me.   BTW it is extremely difficult getting hold of your email address.

Thanks for the useful photograph.   It is exactly what I had hoped for and expected, using the large ornate serifed punch font.   That information confirms to me that the other font with the smaller thin mean unserifed numbers must date from a later period, probably mid to late 1930s.

Quote from: Bernard C
...   2530 may have been the first attempt at a plinth for the 2505 Posy   ...

It certainly wasn't.   I've found all three 2505 Posy vases I have in stock, and the 2530 plinth doesn't come even close to a fit.   As I said before, the 2530 has an inflexible 2ΒΌ" fitting, so must have been a gazunder for something else.   Has anyone any ideas?   What is a 2529, for example, and could it be a candidate?

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright © 2004–14 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Bernard C

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Re: A Sowerby plinth story with a twist in the tale!
« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2008, 04:24:34 PM »
Partial success!

The 2530 was supplied with the 2675 posy set, according to the illustration in Pattern book 37 of May 1954 or 38 of c. 1956, p.5.   I dug out three 2675s and it is a perfect fit on all three (I had forgotten I had them!).   The reality is that all the 2675s I've acquired have been fitted with 2536s, which is a looser fit.   So it looks as if the 2530 was abandoned fairly early on in favour of the more catholic 2536.

That doesn't answer the question of what the 2530 was designed for.   Whatever it was, it must have a pattern number of 2530 or less, possibly considerably less.

... and in the same box was a Rosalin (pink) large 10" incurved 2487 Boat complete with its huge and magnificent four-footed plinth β€” but that's another story.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright © 2004–14 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Bernard C

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Re: A Sowerby plinth story with a twist in the tale!
« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2009, 07:27:21 AM »
...   Rosalin (pink) large 10" incurved 2487 Boat complete with its huge and magnificent four-footed plinth β€” but that's another story.

Now in Pamela's museum, see here and click on the thumbnail image to see the 2487 plinth in its full splendour.

Some interesting info I have another one for you 2528 I know what it is for I missed one a few months back.

Whatever 2528 is, it is not the specially shaped plinth for the 2525, as that is 2531.   Working back through Tony's posts, I surmise that 2528 is probably a circular plinth for the 2525 as per the illustration in Cottle.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright © 2004–14 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: A Sowerby plinth story with a twist in the tale!
« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2009, 10:37:21 AM »
here is the bowl.

Pamela's website uses frames, so the way to show a particular item is to right click, go to this frame and then open frame in new window or tab and then copy that url


Offline Bernard C

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Re: A Sowerby plinth story with a twist in the tale!
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2009, 11:43:53 PM »
...   Pamela's website uses frames, so the way to show a particular item is to right click, go to this frame and then open frame in new window or tab and then copy that url

Christine β€” Thanks, but I don't think it's as simple as that.   Not showing the specific page reference could be for two possible non-technical reasons.   The first is that the website proprietor regards the individual page references as dynamic, and may change them at any time.   The second is that the proprietor wishes all those accessing the website to enter via the home page, where, for example, there could be sales material and/or advertising that helps fund the site.

Are these concerns unfounded?

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright © 2004–14 Bernard Cavalot

Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: A Sowerby plinth story with a twist in the tale!
« Reply #15 on: August 31, 2009, 11:44:18 AM »
It is as simple as that. It's just the way the website is set up Bernard, a way of having fixed top and side menus. The url's aren't dynamic (they aren't going to change unless someone physically goes in and changes them). In Pamela's case, it's probably the way she knows to manage her content. The gasmusterbach site is just the same. It's not a modern way of setting up a web page, as there are now far easier options, but it's one that works for Pamela.

 

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