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Author Topic: Jugs vs. Pitcher - US/UK or Upper Patagonia  (Read 719 times)

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Offline Frank

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Jugs vs. Pitcher - US/UK or Upper Patagonia
« on: May 02, 2008, 08:48:46 AM »
Split from a remark in another discussion...

Assumptions about US/UK variations can also be taken apart, for example, Jugs vs. Pitchers are assumed to be such a variation but both terms were used within both markets by manufacturers in both countries.
  Is there a difference in meaning, or are they synonymous?

I suspect they are synonymous - there is no size relationship for jug, but, most of the to-hand references for pitcher are water pitchers, but there is also a 'Pitcher tumbler' from S&W. My dictionary describes a pitcher as a large jug, usually eathenware, mostly used for water.

At this moment I am even wondering if the US/UK usage, that popped into my head when I made the original remark, is just an aberration of my memory.

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Offline Cathy B

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Re: Jugs vs. Pitcher - US/UK or Upper Patagonia
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2008, 09:54:34 AM »
Here in Lower Patagonia Australia, I assume we use UK terms.  What we would call a milk jug is called a creamer in the US. Could a creamer ever be called a pitcher?

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Offline Leni

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Re: Jugs vs. Pitcher - US/UK or Upper Patagonia
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2008, 10:33:49 AM »
Didn't a pitcher always used to have two handles?  I believe that's where the expression 'little pitchers have big ears' (as in, 'small children may be listening in to adult conversation') comes from.
Leni

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Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Jugs vs. Pitcher - US/UK or Upper Patagonia
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2008, 05:44:37 PM »
New Oxford Dictionary of English says
Pitcher, Brit., a large earthenware container with one or two handles and a lip, for holding liquids
Jug a small or medium-sized cylindrical container with a handle and a lip, used for holding and pouring liquids

Seems to be a size thing over here.

Merriam-Webster's says
Jug, a) chiefly British, a small pitcher, b) a large, deep usually earthenware or glass container with a narrow mouth and a handle
Pitcher, a container for holding and pouring liquids that usually has a lip or spout and a handle

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Offline Anne

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Re: Jugs vs. Pitcher - US/UK or Upper Patagonia
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2008, 06:38:58 PM »
I always think of a creamer as a small jug as used for cream for your coffee, rather than a bigger jug.

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Offline butchiedog

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Re: Jugs vs. Pitcher - US/UK or Upper Patagonia
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2008, 07:25:37 PM »
Hi,

Here in the States it all depends on where your ancestors originated from I guess, as well as what area of the country you are from.



The first is most often referred to as a jug and the other is called a pitcher or a jug, depending on who your are talking to.

A creamer would be a small pitcher/jug most often used to serve cream/milk when one is serving coffee or tea and these usually have a matching sugar bowl. --- Mike

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Offline krsilber

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Re: Jugs vs. Pitcher - US/UK or Upper Patagonia
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2008, 10:30:50 PM »
"Could a creamer ever be called a pitcher?"  I've occasionally seen creamers called cream pitchers.

I used to always think of the big ones as pitchers until I got into "Elegant Glass of the Depression Era" (now there's a misnomer!) - many of those companies (Heisey, Cambridge, Tiffin, etc.) used the term "jug." 

Newman says jugs are usually called pitchers in the US; from what I've seen, I think that's a pretty correct generalization.
Kristi


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Offline Frank

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Re: Jugs vs. Pitcher - US/UK or Upper Patagonia
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2008, 09:04:50 AM »
I suspect that this is just another example of language evolution, with jug rising to prominence in the UK and pitcher larger in disuse. In the US Pitcher has maintained its use and creamer becoming a popular term too.

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