Author Topic: John Derbyshire Newfoundland dog PWs — Why no TM or Reg. Lozenge?  (Read 1971 times)

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Offline Bernard C

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Jenny Thompson, in her The Identification of English Pressed Glass, published in 1989, recognised that a Landseer painting A Distinguished Member of the Humane Society inspired John Derbyshire's Newfoundland dog paperweights.

However there is more information available today.    This can provide a better understanding of why these dog PWs were produced without a Trade Mark or Registration Lozenge.

Landseer was, perhaps, Victoria's favourite artist, painting most, if not all, of her children and pets.   His death on 1 October 1873 was marked throughout England, with drawn curtains, flags at half-mast, and his Trafalgar Square lions bedecked with wreaths.   His funeral was a sumptious affair, drawing large crowds, and ending with his remains being buried in Westminster Abbey.

When Trafalgar Square lions started being sold, it didn't take John Derbyshire too long to join in on the lucative souvenir/commemorative bonanza — just nine months.   His Lion paperweights were registered on 3 July 1874, and were also trade marked with his JD over an anchor mark.   No need for caution, after all the lions were public property, so it was most unlikely that problems would be encountered with any copyright vested in the sculptures.

It sold well.   So well that he had to start a series to satisfy demand.   He was most careful with each, quite deliberately registering designs when applicable.    His Greyhound, Britannia, and Winged Sphinx were all registered and trademarked.   However his Punch, Judy, and The Old Rugged Cross were just trademarked, almost certainly indicating that the designs were widely available in books, so registration as an original design was inappropriate.   So it looks as if John Derbyshire followed the rules.   ... as also did Molineaux, Webb & Co., with their Sphinx, for example.

Back to the dogs.   Landseer painted several pictures featuring black and white Newfoundland dogs, including the one above, Off to the Rescue, and Saved.   This last painting is quite a close match to Derbyshire's paperweight, so, as it was quite definitely protected by copyright, John Derbyshire, true to form, was rather more cautious, and had it made without any inscription identifying him and his glassworks.  Or, to put it another way, his paperweight was rather more a "copy of" than an "inspired by".

Does this explanation make sense?   Are there any alternative theories?

Bernard C.  8)

Note that these black and white Newfoundlands are now known as Landseers.
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Leni

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Could you post a picture of one of the Derbyshire paperweight dogs please, Bernard?  So that those of us who are not as familiar with them can compare them with the Landseer pictures? 

Your theory does indeed sound reasonable to me!

BTW, I love the way the little girl 'Saved' - presumably from the sea? - has managed to keep quite dry, and even to keep her hat on!   What a clever dog, eh?   ;) 
Leni


Offline Bernard C

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Quote from: Leni
Could you post a picture of one of the Derbyshire paperweight dogs please, Bernard?  So that those of us who are not as familiar with them can compare them with the Landseer pictures?   ...

Sorry, I can't — I've not found one.   And I've never owned one.   You mean that you didn't see the example on the stall opposite me at Gaydon?   ... and before you ask, no I've not found one of The Old Rugged Cross either.

Quote from: Leni
...   BTW, I love the way the little girl 'Saved' - presumably from the sea? - has managed to keep quite dry, and even to keep her hat on!   What a clever dog, eh?   ;) 

Miraculous, really.   Anyway, that's what you did then to pay the rent, and he was extremely successful at it.

Bernard C.  8)

ps — Derbyshire / M&W Anvil coming soon, once I'm happy with the photographs.
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Bernard C

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I've just found out why the Newfoundland dog paperweights don't carry the John Derbyshire trademark.

Because they were made by Percival Vickers & Co. Ltd., appearing in their 1881 Pressed Glass Catalogue.   Anyway my explanation still holds for the lack of a Registration lozenge!   See Barbara Yates, The Glasswares of Percival Vickers & Co. Ltd, Jersey Street, Manchester, 1844–1914, in The Journal of The Glass Association, vol.2, 1987.

One of my better got-it-wrongs, I believe.  ;D

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Sue C

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Is this the one you mean Bernard?


Offline Bernard C

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Quote from: Sue C
Is this the one you mean Bernard?

Sue — No it isn't.   Nothing like it.   The PV Newfoundland is facing forwards on an oval plateau with curved gadroons all the way up the sides, not stopping a third of the way up like yours!   I wonder if yours came as a mirror image disparate pair, like china dogs?

I had wondered whether I should ever have started this nightmare topic.   I only did it to clear the way for my Manchester anvil.   Still, reviewing it last night, it has recovered some semblance of order.   At the very least it might have made some readers smile.   Then you do this to me, Sue!   What have I done to deserve it?   And today of all days (bus pass day).   And my OH thinks it's funny!   And I suppose I do as well!

Glad you posted, Sue, and grateful thanks for the photograph.

 :hug:

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


 

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