Author Topic: A rather ornate celery vase?  (Read 7696 times)

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Offline Glen

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A rather ornate celery vase?
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2005, 03:04:11 PM »
Hi fiddlesticks - I'm a bit puzzled (happens a lot nowadays  :lol:)

You said
Quote from: "fiddlesticks"
thanks everso for the info Glen, suppose it's pretty much the same but UK and USA call it something different.


What is it that the UK and the USA use different terms for?

BTW, I think your piece is a vase - and a splendid one too!

Glen
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Offline fiddlesticks

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A rather ornate celery vase?
« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2005, 09:30:34 PM »
are we opting for more of a vase than a celery vase then folks, seems a good difference of opinion. :lol:


Offline Glen

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A rather ornate celery vase?
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2005, 07:24:41 AM »
This is quite an interesting point...

When is a vase not a vase? When it's a celery. So what are the defining characteristics that make a celery a celery and a vase a vase? I think it's fair to say that pretty much all celeries could double up as vases, yet all vases couldn't double up as celeries.

I tend to think of a celery as having fairly specific proportions, whereby it's not tall and elegant, but is instead, more of a chunky shape.

And to muddy the waters totally, what would you call this shape? (Apologies at borrowing someone's eBay auction just to illustrate a point about shape)
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/CARNIVAL-GLASS-CELERY-VASE_W0QQitemZ7342214624QQcategoryZ16QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

It's often called a celery. To make things worse, it has been termed a Chalice and is still referred to as a Cathedral Chalice in some books. In fact, according to the maker of the piece (Brockwitz) it is a Traubenspuler. In French a coupe lave-raisin. In English a celery. Now if my attempts at German and French are correct, I believe that the item would also have been used for grapes (to clean them).

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
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Offline ChrisStewart

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A rather ornate celery vase?
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2005, 07:31:19 AM »
Hi All,

Quote from: "Adam"
Fiddlesticks - I presume your vase has "celery" marked on it somewhere.  This was a tax fiddle in the UK (and elsewhere??) immediately post WW2.  Any container to hold foodstuffs attracted low or zero tax.  No one seriously expected it to be used for anything other than flowers!


The government eventually got wise to this tax fiddle and introduced maximum sizes for these 'foodstuff' articles. A celery could only be called a celery if it was less than a certain size.

Regards

Chris
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A rather ornate celery vase?
« Reply #14 on: August 09, 2005, 05:42:03 PM »
Quote from: "Glen"

And to muddy the waters totally, what would you call this shape? (Apologies at borrowing someone's eBay auction just to illustrate a point about shape)
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/CARNIVAL-GLASS-CELERY-VASE_W0QQitemZ7342214624QQcategoryZ16QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Glen


that is sooooooo spooky Glen  :wink: , just had a look at the auction and see what I have, looks exactly the same pattern to me, I have a pair.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v43/fiddlesticks/depressvase1.jpg

Don't the americans call this shape a spooner?  
Are mine celery vases then or are we going for vases  :lol:


Offline fiddlesticks

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A rather ornate celery vase?
« Reply #15 on: August 09, 2005, 05:45:11 PM »
oooooooooooooops,  :oops:   last post was from me, forgot to sign in  :oops:  :oops:


Offline Glen

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A rather ornate celery vase?
« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2005, 06:56:53 PM »
Fiddlesticks - a spooner is a different thing again. It came as part of a 4 piece table set: covered butter, (usually covered) sugar, spooner and creamer. The spooner generally looked pretty much the same as the covered sugar but without the lid. I am sure you know, but for anyone who might not, it was intended to hold spoons at table.

The celery vase on the auction (which is the same as your clear glass one) was made by Brockwitz in Germany. It is a celery vase, or a traubenspuler (for your grapes). Brockwitz made a number of similar shaped items.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
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Offline glasswizard

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A rather ornate celery vase?
« Reply #17 on: August 09, 2005, 07:56:03 PM »
It does get confusing. All the different shapes. Besides the different pieces Glen mentioned in the four pc. table set, Butter, sugar, creamer, spooner, you can add the celery, various sized compotes, trays, bowls salt dips (which went in conjuction with the celery vase, they were small dishes to hold salt and to dip your celery in.) Early American Pattern glass can be viewed much like a china service today. You would pick a favorite pattern and try to have as many pieces as you could so they all matched. Quite a feat when one considers that a given pattern might contain the celery vase, a dish for pickles and a seperate one for olives, an almond dish, cheese dish, jelly dish, mustard jar, toothpick holder, tumblers, goblets, etc.
Many a time I have had a dish and once having learned the pattern name, then tried to find out exactly what the dish was for. And to think at that time, no dishwashers OH MY!
Anyway for your enjoyment here is a selection of celery vases to show some of the variety you can find.
http://tinypic.com/a9og8l.jpg  Terry


Offline Glen

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A rather ornate celery vase?
« Reply #18 on: August 09, 2005, 08:02:45 PM »
Gorgeous pic of your celeries, Terry!

English tableware was exactly the same as EAPG during that era. Dishes for everything you could name, plus a few more besides. If you look at the page on this link (the Sowerby CD) and scroll down to the sample pages, you can see a small selection of tableware shapes in the Pineapple pattern.
http://www.geocities.com/carni_glass_uk_2000/sowerbycd.html

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Anonymous

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A rather ornate celery vase?
« Reply #19 on: August 12, 2005, 05:19:01 PM »
lovely celery vases Terry, none that I have come across in the UK.  

Oooooo, so I have a pair of German celery vases then like the one listed on ebay, goody goody.  Any idea of age Glen

 



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