Author Topic: Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?  (Read 3397 times)

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Connie

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2005, 09:32:06 AM »
Leni - are you talking about amberina or satin glass?

New England Glass began producing amberina glass in 1883.  Satin glass was also very popular in the 1880s in the US and most was produced in WV, PA, NY and New England.


Offline Leni

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2005, 09:39:09 AM »
Sorry, Connie, I got confused and so I edited my post  :oops:

I don't understand why you say it has to be satinised Amberina, rather than Burmese.  What is the difference in the production of these types of glass?  :?  

Again, I'm afraid I'm showing my ignorance of American made glass  :oops:  :roll:

Leni
Leni


Connie

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2005, 09:39:21 AM »
Leni - The easiest way is to show you.

Amberina Glass


Burmese

Both are color struck glass.  The deeper red or rose color is formed when the  piece is reheated. For instance, just the top of a vase or the top of a tumbler.

One of the glass artists that post here can maybe give us some information on the difference in the glass formulas between the 2 types of glass.


Connie

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #13 on: August 12, 2005, 09:47:00 AM »
Leni -

I think I understand what you are asking now. If both types of glass are pink to yellow shaded and Burmese is opaque and Amberina is transparent, then why is my piece not Burmese?  Does that sum up your question?  I think it is basically what Mr. Vaseline (sorry I don't remember your real name) was thinking also.

IMHO - there is a difference.  Amberina glass always starts out life as a transparent glass which may become opaque or translucent through further treatment ie. satin finish by acid


On the other hand Burmese glass starts out life as a opaque glass (it is never transparent)but  it can also be shiny (see my shiny Burmese vase in the links above) or more commonly is a matte finish (see the other pieces in my link.) which is result of acid finishing also.


Offline Leni

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2005, 09:57:06 AM »
Thank you, Connie  :D

However, I was further confused when I 'googled' and found this in 'The Journal of Antiques and Collectables':
Quote
Mount Washington Glass...by William C. Marcoux Jr
In 1884, Mount Washington began using the name, Amberina, for a new glassware they were producing. It was a heat sensitive glass, meaning that when reheated during production the portion reheated changes color. This glass was made by adding gold to an amber glass mixture. When completed the glass shaded from amber to red. Shading varied depending on the duration of the reheating. This was an extremely popular product. New England Glass Company, however, was producing a similar ware at the same time and under the same name. A lawsuit ensued and the result was that New England Glass Company was allowed to keep the name, Amberina, and Mount Washington was forced to use a different name. They chose to call their ware Rose Amber and on May 25, 1886, they were issued a patent for that name. Rose Amber was made in many forms and occasionally was etched, pressed, cut or decorated with applied Rose Amber glass. It is nearly impossible to distinguish between pieces made by these two factories with the exception of the pieces with applied rigaree and wishbones, which are uniquely Mount Washington forms. Recent findings indicate that Mount Washington was likely producing this glassware before New England, but had not applied for a patent in a timely fashion.

On December 15, 1885, Mount Washington was granted a patent for a glassware called Burmese. It is believed that this glass had been made for several years before that date. It is a homogeneous heat sensitive glass, shading from lemon yellow to salmon pink. Burmese was discovered serendipitously by Frederick Shirley when he was filling in for an ailing glassmaker in 1881. Mr. Shirley had devised formulas for making glass but had not blown glass. He was working with a mixture of ruby glass and had trouble keeping the gold in the mixture from sinking to the bottom so he added some uranium oxide to the mix, and Burmese was born. Like all blown glass, Burmese is shiny in its original form. The tastes of the day, however, favored a soft satin finish which was created by exposing the object to acid. Burmese was sold in both. The shiny finish was marketed as the natural finish, and the satin finish as the plush finish.


Leni  :?
Leni


Offline mrvaselineglass

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2005, 12:20:32 PM »
The original photo looked like a rich pink at the top and yellow at the bottom. I could not see through the glass, due to the satin finish.  That is why I was confused.  my mistake.  

Dave Peterson


Offline KevinH

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2005, 01:15:15 PM »
Hi folks,

Leni's quote about the "dispute" between Mt Washington and New England adds some interesting extra snippets to what is stated in various books. But while reading it I wondered if a basic question had been asked / answered before.

The Amberina patent was taken out by Joseph Locke for Libbey's New England Glass Company (a year after he emigrated to the US from England). But was Amberina also made, regardless of the US patent, in the UK and Europe? Or perhaps just marketed under the name, if not actually made as such?

Just wondering, really, because much glass in "UK collector fairs" that looks anything like 'red-and-amber' is usually labelled up as "Amberina", and I wondered if some may have been UK or European made.

--------------------
Also, on the subject of "heat sensitive" glass (needing "striking" to achieve the result), the equally interesting thread back in April on "Bluerina Revisted", very usefully discussed this. Check it out here: http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,1247.0.html
---------------------
KevinH


Anonymous

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2005, 01:47:41 PM »
Both Burmese and Amberina (the old Amberina) used gold not selenium as the colorant just like cranberry glass.


Connie

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #18 on: August 12, 2005, 03:24:20 PM »
Glen -

But that is a mis-use of the term amberina in reference to Fenton pieces.  Fenton made Ruby glass in the 1920s which had selenium as the colorant.  As I said before old Ruby does tend to have some yellow around the edges or in the middle since it is also a heat struck glass.  BUT Fenton never called this color amberina.


Anonymous

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2005, 07:57:21 PM »
I heard back from Pauline Griscom.  She says my little toothpick is Murano and that she can tell my the shape. She didn't give me a reason - such as finding one with a label, saw one made  :wink:

She just recommended I buy her book  :roll:


Since I really don't have that much interest in toothpick holders I can't see buying a book specifically on them.  I think I will just donate this little piece to Goodwill.

 

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