Author Topic: Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?  (Read 3779 times)

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Connie

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« on: August 09, 2005, 08:09:47 PM »
I have this amberina toothpick which I have tried and tried to identify. I finally settled on it being either NEG or Mt. Wash.  Today I got an e-mail that it was newer and Italian. The person did not provide a reference to why they thought that.

Here is the toothpick - I apologize for the link to one of my active shop items but I am away on travel which means I don't have access to my original photos.

http://www.grayhorseglass.com/items/425051/item425051store.html#item

What are your thoughts on the origin?

Of course, I want my representation and description to be accurate.

Thank you for your help.


Offline chuggy

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toothpick
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2005, 09:40:44 PM »
Hi Connie
Certainl;y doesn't look very Italian to me.
Paul
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Offline glasswizard

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2005, 07:35:52 AM »
Connie, I agree with Chuggy. I wonder if the person was thinking of the Italian Burmese that came out several years back. The problem with their Burmese was in several areas, the thickness of the glass, the color was not quite right and the tool marks for crimping was very noticeable. In other words the quality just was not there. That said, your piece looks like nice quality. I have looked through my books on Toothpicks and am coming up empty handed. I will admit I  have never seen Satin Amberina and the shape of yours does not match the known shapes of Amberina Toothpicks pictured in the books. So for me its still a bit of a puzzler, a nice puzzler at that. Sorry not to be of more help. Terry


Connie

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2005, 08:27:51 AM »
I heard back from the person who is the founder a toothpick collector'society, this is what she said (some words ediited for privacy)

Quote
Pauline
Griscom (email: xxxx) published a small book called Is It Old? Or
Is It New? and she pictures quite a few of the Murano toothpick holders.
There have also been numerous articles in the Toothpick Bulletin and other
antique-related publications.  Most of the Murano toothpick holders can be
identified by their shape.

I can't provide a specific reference, but hope this info helps.


I will contact Pauline Griscom and the original e-mailer and ask them to join this discussion.  

Again I am away from home and can't hold the item in question, but if I remember correctly it shows considerable wear to the bottom.

So how new is new?


Offline lhazeldahl

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2005, 09:55:25 PM »
Connie,
   I don't know anything about origins and such, but your little toothpick is just great.  I think your discription sounds fine, and, by the way, I love your site.  Be safe in your travels, we need you back!!    :D

Linda
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Offline Sid

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2005, 11:35:53 PM »
Hello:

I have the Griscom book and she shows your toothpick on the very first page of her book.  The page is titled "Contemporary Toothpicks" with no information beyond that.

I hadn't thought of her book before the posting above as most of it pertains to pressed toothpick holders.  It is an excellent book.

I think an email to Pauline would be a good idea.

Sid


Connie

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2005, 09:59:00 AM »
Thank you, Sid.  I have e-mailed Pauline and invited her to the forum.

I would be interested in her attribtution to it being a comtemporary piece.  I am assuming that someone found one with a label but you know about assumptions  :roll:


Offline mrvaselineglass

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2005, 11:05:10 PM »
I think AMBERINA might be the wrong descriptor.  It looks like BURMESE to me.  There is also a lot of satin burmese that was made.  Burmese will glow a bright green under a UV blacklight.  Amberina will not glow green.
You might want to put a UV light on it and see what happens.


Connie

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2005, 08:58:58 AM »
Mr. Vaseline I respectively disagree.  This toothpick looks nothing like Burmese.

Amberina is transparent glass which is red (or shades of red, orange, fuschia) shading to amber.

Burmese is an opaque glass which is salmon (deep pink) fading to a creamy yellow.

Maybe my pictures are just really bad, but this piece was transparent red to amber glass that was then satinized (acid etched).


Offline Leni

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Amberina Toothpick - American or Italian?
« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2005, 09:06:51 AM »
Quote from: "grayhorse"
this piece was transparent red to amber glass that was then satinized (acid etched).

 
So why is this definitely not Burmese?   :?  

Can you explain the difference?

Leni
Leni

 

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