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Author Topic: Pressed glass crown jar, RD 183953, Alfred Edmund Edwardes, 14 February 1865.  (Read 8133 times)

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Offline Anne

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    • Glass trinket sets
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Both topics merged for the sake of completeness.

Offline agincourt17

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It’s been almost 5 years since topic
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,1012.0.html
was last aired, and over the course of time Glen’s green uranium crown as discussed in the first post  of the thread has lost its photo (which later morphs into a link from Christine in reply #31).

Mixed in with that topic thread is a mention of “a blue (milk!!) glass cushion pot with a crown as the lid, on the base of the cushion is a Reg Diamond mark for 14 February 1865” (reply #20). This, it transpires, corresponds to a registered design number 183953, registered by Alfred Edmund Edwardes, Alber (or Alver?) Cottage, Twickenham Green, Middlesex, and the design is for a jar.

Tigerchips, in reply #22, kindly provided a link to more details, including the registration representation, online from the National Archives at
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/designregisters/item.asp?cat_id=0&type_id=0&shape_id=5&item_id=183953 now at
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/designregisters/propitemdetail.asp?item_id=183953&proprietor=14&backpage=1

In reply #26, Dave Peterson provides a link to what appears to be a similar Edwardes crown, but with BACCARAT market inside the bottom. Inevitably, of course, that ebay link is now dead.

So, to cut to the chase, I have photos of two examples of the Alfred Edmund Edwardes RD 183953 crown (both with the lozenge for 14 February 1865) to post (hopefully staying visible for some time to come).  Each crown has a base measuring about 4 inches square, and stand about 4 inches tall (but, looking at the National Archives representation, both crowns have lost the cross from the top of the crown).

I have posted it separately from the original thread because I think this glass crown jar is sufficiently interesting to merit a topic thread of its own:
firstly, it is one of the few registrations of designs in glass deemed sufficiently important / interesting to be given a substantial descriptive and illustrated link of its own by the National Archives,
and secondly, this glass crown is something of an oddity which, nevertheless, proves a rule – despite being of glass, the lozenge indicates a registration in Class I, metal. Further research shows that “this design was also registered in Class III (glass) and Class IV (earthenware), so the same registry mark has been used irrespective if the material.  This means that the same design could be used for a variety of objects of the same form but made from different materials. Multiple class registration is often used by manufacturers of cosmetic/perfume containers.”

First the photos of a crown jar in transparent yellow uranium glass (which reacts strongly to UV light).

(Permission for the re-use of the images of this yellow uranium glass crown jar granted by Paula Chapman)

Offline agincourt17

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Here are the photos of the second example of the crown jar, this time in jade opaque / milk glass. Unfortunately, the owner was unable to test the glass for its reaction to UV light

(Permission for the re-use of the images of this jade crown jar granted by gold_pins).

Does anyone have photos of this type of crown jar complete with its pinnacle cross?

There are now, obviously, mention of glass examples in yellow uranium, jade milk and blue milk glass – any more examples in other colours to show?

As this design was registered in Classes I, III and IV, does anyone have photos of  examples in metal or earthenware to share?


Offline Baked_Beans

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I found this example today , sadly it's badly damaged . It's not just chipped and missing the cross but it's ''chunked '' to the base of the crown . One of the feet to the cushion has been damaged too. I bought it in a charity shop for £2.00. If you don't have an example of this, agincourt17, then I would be pleased to send it to you free of any charge  :)  I guess it's better to have a damaged one than none  :-\ It really does glow and the detail is excellent (not shown in the photos) there are even one or two black 'seeds'  in the glass plus loads of wear to the base  :D Ta, Mike.

P.S. Thanks for posting this thread ....sorry I couldn't find a better example !

http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,1012.0.html
Mike

Offline agincourt17

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Thank you, Mike, for your very kind offer, but I no longer collect pressed glass pieces. Almost all the pieces I did possess have been donated either to various museums and collections or to my favourite charities, and I am quite happy now with the pleasure I get from simply researching new items I encounter.

I still haven’t come across an RD 183953 crown jar with an intact terminal cross but, looking back through my reference photos, I do have an example in milky white glass to show that has some of the details still retaining remnants of gold paint or enamel.

(Permission for the re-use of these images on the GMB granted by Alison Whitaker).

Fred.

Offline Baked_Beans

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Thanks for the pics. Fred, it's an interesting area of collecting which I've just discovered by finding this piece. I might give it back to the charity shop unless you know anyone that might like it  ;) Thanks again for all your research ! I will try to look out of an intact one ! Cheers , Mike.
Mike

Offline David E

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Hi Mike, I would be interested in it, if that's OK? You can mail me from the envelope icon on the left of this panel. I usually make a donation to my favourite charity in cases like this: www.acorns.org.uk where I worked as a volunteer for several years. Just say how much! I'll reimburse postage of course.
David
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Offline Baked_Beans

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Yes , I will send it on to you and I will send a message via your envelope....later today ...must dash now ! Don't worry about the postage !
Mike

Offline David E

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Mike has kindly sent this on, and it is an excellent piece of pressed glass! I note that none of the examples has the cross on top of the crown as these were obviously so easily broken off.

The registration mark is curious with Class 1 putting it into the category of metal. We have come across this before: G P Tye's registered design of 1850 was marked on the vase, although not a lozenge, but was actually for the metal support that fitted to the vase. However, I agree that in this case it almost certainly pertains to a metal (or other) version of this glass object, as suggested by Fred.

I would like to make a small correction: the registrant's name was not Alfred Edward Edmundes, but Alfred Edward Edwardes as shown on the National Archives page. A Google search reveals nothing concrete of this name, with either spelling. Another thought is that this name is not always the designer, but could have been a registration agent, although I would have thought the glassmaker was mentioned somewhere on the registration.

Patricia is going to the Design Archives in September, so hopefully she can clear this up for sure, unless Paul is there anytime soon?
David
► Chance Additions ◄
The 2nd volume of the domestic glassware of Chance Brothers
Contact ► Cortex Design ◄ to order any book

Offline agincourt17

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Thank you for correcting the registrant’s surname, David.

I had obviously originally transcribed  it wrongly ( a written version of a ‘Spoonerism’ – there must surely be a  proper word for it) because the registrant’s name is actually Alfred Edmund Edwardes.

Forunately, Slack has it transcribed correctly, as per the written details with TNA’s design representation.

I will ask the moderators nicely to correct the registrant’s name in the topic heading.

Fred.

 

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