Author Topic: Blown Amberina  (Read 1558 times)

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Offline glasswizard

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Blown Amberina
« on: August 14, 2005, 10:21:07 AM »
Glen started a wonderful thread about pressed red and amberina. I have had this piece for a number of years and it has always fascinated me.
http://tinypic.com/ajmtet.jpg  Standing apprx. 5 1/2 inches high, it is blown with a rough pontil. The base starts out a very nice amber  shading into a sort of red but the thing that is amazing is that the red then goes into blue at the rim. It has been a puzzle for quite awhile and I thought I would share it and see if anyone has any ideas.

Here is another pic, this time of just the rim http://tinypic.com/ajndqu.jpg

Thanks Terry


Offline Glen

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Blown Amberina
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2005, 10:55:52 AM »
Terry - fabulous!

I am not really au fait with blown glass, but quoting from Revi (19th Century Glass) in the chapter on amberina, he says:

Quote
"The patent (for amberina) also provided for the development of a violet shade, and greenish, bluish and other tints through the controlled use of the caloric available to the glassworker by reheating articles through the small aperture of the glory hole, or the larger aperture of the castor hole".


Then later in the chapter he adds, with reference to "plated amberina":

Quote
"hereby a piece of opal or opalescent glass, plated with a gold-ruby mixture, was reheated to develop a deeper color at portions which would blend into the lighter part of the glass, not sufficiently reheated to develop any color. When sensitive amber and gold-ruby metal (Amberina) was used, the result would appear in the Amberina shading; a sensitive cobalt and ruby glass mixture would produce a plated ware shading from blue to ruby."

Not sure if this helps, but it's the best I can do  :shock:

Glen
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Offline chopin-liszt

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Blown Amberina
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2005, 11:07:10 AM »
:D Hi Terry, I should think the info about heat-sensitive glass that came out in these threads should be relevant!

http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,563.0.html

http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,1247.0.html

(Edited to add another thread reference)
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline glasswizard

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Blown Amberina
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2005, 12:02:25 PM »
Thank you Glen and Sue. I will confess that Revi just makes my head spin LOL. Some friends of mine, in having fun, decided to name this type of glass "Fuschia Glass" because it reminded them of a fuschia. Ok I have strange friends. I think we should start a thread called strange and wonderful (although the wonderful part may be in the eye of the beholder).Of course in looking around here, I may have some examples that can fill that description. Terry


Offline Glen

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Blown Amberina
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2005, 12:07:24 PM »
I totally agree with you Terry, Revi makes my head spin too. I find lot of things that don't seem logical, and things that seem to contradict, but then I always assume that it's just me :roll: I just thought I'd try and look intellectual by quoting from him  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:

I always find Rubina Verde a weird sort of color. But it must be an easy one to make 'cos the Far Eastern fakers (!) have done repro Grape & Cable hatpin holders in it.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline glasswizard

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Blown Amberina
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2005, 12:27:22 PM »
Grape and cable hatpin holder in Rubina Verde, The mind boggles!!!!! I had at one time a Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. Hobnail pitcher in Rubina Verde and to say the colors were "loud" would be an understatement. It definately showed the plated affect as I remember, the vaseline just stopped and the ruby top started with a clearly defined line. It was one of those pieces that you say to yourself "Thank goodness that sold." Terry


Offline KevinH

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Blown Amberina
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2005, 12:00:42 AM »
If it was made by Thomas Webb, I would say it is "Alexandrite" - the "tri-coloured, amber-rose-violet" I mentioned in the heat-sensitive topic that Sue linked to above. But I don't think the vase has the Webb quality I would usually expect.

It might be, confusingly (as pointed out by Glen and Terry in reference to the Revi book), an item produced under Locke's "amberina" patent that provided for the "... development of a violet shade ...", but not as a "plated ware" as Revi sates in the part quoted by Glen.

The vase does not seem to be "plated", in other words, having an applied separate colour. Therefore the blue (violet) at the rim is the result of that part receiving a further reheating after the initial reheating had produced the "amberina" colouring.

Or, I suppose it could have been intended a basic "amberina" piece but that the rim received just enough extra heat to cause it to strike the "rose" into "violet". A bit like the sort of pleasant "accident" that first resulted in two and three coloured pieces through reheating? Could that possible, or going back to sqaure one, would it have been a planned result having mixed the batch to produce exactly that colouring?
KevinH


Offline glasswizard

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Blown Amberina
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2005, 08:59:03 AM »
Kev, I agree with the Webb assessment. After doing some research and seeing pictures of Webb Alexandrite I came to one certain conclusion. The amber part of mine is too dark. Webb's is such a soft light amber. Also quality is lacking in mine.
What does not show very well in my picture is the diamond optic. So taking different factors into consideration IMHO this is a piece that to me becomes a good example of the striking of colors and I suspect that the finished article was not fully what was intended, this of course is just a suspicion. I also get the impression that this color is not something I will run into very often, so a good example to keep. Terry


Connie

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Blown Amberina
« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2005, 11:13:32 AM »
Terry - I think your piece may also be an Murano reproduction due to the thickness of the glass.

Do a search  on my shop for amberina.  I now think that the tumbler I have is also a Murano reproduction.  I think the plate may be real.  I also had a finger bowl which was authentic Victorian (I think) and the glass was much thinner and has a fully polished pontil mark.

The coloration of all 3 of my pieces were very similar. The bowl has sold so I can't do a side by side comparison.  But they are all what is referred to as fuschia amberina.


 

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