Author Topic: Monster bowl on a black plinth/stand ID = Century Glass  (Read 3635 times)

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Offline Anne E.B.

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Monster bowl on a black plinth/stand
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2005, 09:35:32 PM »
Quote from: "Anonymous"
Anne E B ........ Plus Experts please

Just out of curiosity when you hold your base up to the light is the tint mauve or blue??........


Regards


Gareth

Morgan48


Well I'll be....!   Its definitely mauve/purple Gareth :?

Regards - Anne.
Anne E.B


Offline bubbles

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Monster bowl on a black plinth/stand
« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2005, 11:17:50 PM »
At risk of embarrasing myself (if I'm wrong), but I believe this would be called black amethyst.  I understand that true black was not possible to make at the time so they used this as the next best thing.  I'm assuming that black glass can now be made, but I'm sure someone will put me straight on that.


Anonymous

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Monster bowl on a black plinth/stand
« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2005, 08:10:59 AM »
Quote from: bubbles
, but I believe this would be called black amethyst.

Hi Bubbles

Most of mine show amethyst when subjected to light but I do have a couple of "black" ones that , when held up, are quite a rich and a definite blue colour.


Regards


Gareth


Offline Max

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Monster bowl on a black plinth/stand
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2005, 08:39:49 AM »
I thought black was created using an overload of almost any other colour, which is why black pieces look a different colour held up to the light.  

I also have an idea the most commonly used colour to create black has something to do with potassium.  I think I need some expert input to get this straight in my head too, thanks for bringing it up Gareth.   8)
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Offline Glen

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« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2005, 09:45:08 AM »
My understanding of black glass is that it is created by the addition of cobalt with copper or manganese, or simply by adding a lot of colorants together.

Purple is made by the addition of manganese, nickel or neodymium.

In my experience much apparently black glass will show deep purple (or deep blue) when held up to an intensely strong light source.

I have been told that some welding visors are made from black amethyst glass to protect the eyes from the intense light.
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Offline Adam

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Monster bowl on a black plinth/stand
« Reply #15 on: August 15, 2005, 10:34:50 AM »
I can't see how a true black would be possible - the thinnest sliver would be bound to show some colour.

Potassium doesn't come into it, Max.  Max and Glen yes, there will be fancy combinations of colourants which will make black, but why bother?  Gross excess of almost any colourant will make what for practical purposes will be black.  The cheapest is (or was) manganese, so that is what was commonly used.  It's only if you are using much smaller amounts of manganese to give an obvious purple that you would play about with potassium replacing some sodium to give a prettier colour.

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Offline Max

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Monster bowl on a black plinth/stand
« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2005, 12:23:18 PM »
I think I might have found Anne's bowl:

<photo edited out until permission granted>

Mould 450, 16th September, 1950.


I recently came across an article about Century Glass, who were based in Edmonton, London.  I was only really skimming it until I saw this pic (above) and thought 'Hmm...I recognise that...'   :D

'Century Glass was a previously unknown Glasshouse, until a ledger was donated to the Shipley Art Gallery in Gateshead.  The spine was labelled Century Glass, and from the Pottery Gazette Reference book of 1956, this was identified as the trade name of the Century Glassworks Ltd. based at the Angel Factory Colony, Angel Road, Edmonton'.

I do have more information, but feel unsure about whether I can crib someones article onto this forum.   :?
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Offline Glen

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Monster bowl on a black plinth/stand
« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2005, 12:48:03 PM »
FASCINATING.

Would love to know more.

Glen
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Offline Anne

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Monster bowl on a black plinth/stand
« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2005, 12:58:51 PM »
Ohhh well spotted Max... t'other Anne will surely be thrilled. ;)

I've never heard of Century Glass and it's not listed in Ivo's A-Z book.  Does the article  give working dates Max?  Also, can you post the source of the article you were reading please?

As to cribbing from the article, if it's recent then consent to reproduce in part or all may be possible? If not, then extract the facts (facts are not copyrightable... it's the way in which they are presented that is) from the piece and post those. :)


Offline Max

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Monster bowl on a black plinth/stand
« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2005, 02:52:05 PM »
Dear Anne and Glen

I read the article about 'Century Glass' in the Glass Circle News, dated 2nd June, 2005.  Funny how each time I re-read those things, I find something else of interest!  I think it's probably because my base interest in types of glass is slowly expanding - which is mostly down to this board.   :D  

I've dropped 'The Glass Circle' a line and asked if I can quote from their article - I don't think I want to get on the wrong side of them   :shock: , esp as a very new and shiny member of their society!     :shock:  :wink:  :D

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