Author Topic: Bowl, I can't identify  (Read 2375 times)

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Offline Glassyone

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Bowl, I can't identify
« on: August 16, 2005, 12:13:32 AM »
I don't know about going blind from googling but people do go myopic. I expect a few might get a DVT too.

This is a small bowl 13 cm across, with a lovely 'ping' and was a gift. It is not particularly light.  
 


http://tinypic.com/aljjpj.jpg
http://tinypic.com/aljlp4.jpg

Regards Ruth


Offline Glassyone

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bowl
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2005, 07:23:09 PM »
Thankyou, I know we have owned it for 20- 30 years. Will see if my mother can remember where my father bought it.
Ruth.


Offline Glassyone

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bowl
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2005, 07:20:55 AM »
http://tinypic.com/atn0gh.jpg

It is hard to resolve this.

The 'not white' glass is opaque and it looks grey, both with the naked eye and with flash, it is not frosted.

Perhaps it is 'studio glass', now why do glass people make something like this and leave no identifying marks?

To me it seems this is odd, someone with some considerable skill, put effort in to making this and the glass seems to be of great quality, why did they not go the extra tiny bit, in terms of leaving any identity?
Ruth


Offline KevinH

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Bowl, I can't identify
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2005, 01:29:08 AM »
Hi Ruth,

I don't think that the eBay piece, or your bowl, are truly "Nailsea" style.

The "Nailsea" style of swags / gadroons / pulled loops was much more "free hand" and the stripes generally varied in size, with many being quite thick. Also, the number of trails were fewer and were pulled into fewer loops.

But they might be "Victorian" since pulled-up trailing in that very neat style was developed in the late 19th century.
KevinH


Offline KevinH

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Bowl, I can't identify
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2005, 11:16:50 PM »
Hi Ruth,

When I think of "Nailsea style", I usually have in mind items such as those shown in http://www.hbe.co.uk/Glass.htm and in particular the "speckled" jugs / bottles and the white looped pipe.

However, your stemmed glass with orange looped decoration is, indeed, in a style that has been referred to as "Nailsea". See http://www.lady.co.uk/articles/0415artA.cfm?framed=y where, at the top right, there is a picture showing a decanter and tumbler in much the same decoration.

Unfortunately, the text in that second website seems to suggest that various items were actually made at Nailsea (and the author does not state the source of the information). Other literature, such as the booklet The Nailsea Glassworks by Margaret Thomas, tells us that Nailsea were crown glass and bottle manufacturers and that the decorated items, which gave rise to the term "Nailsea type", were simply "friggers" ("whimsies"). I would even be reluctant to refer to the cranberry bell with white looping, as shown in that website, as "Nailsea style". And as for Nailsea using "latticino" and "millefiori" techniques, well ... what will people come up with next?

Generally, I think that there's a lot of looped or threaded glassware which has been given the label "Nailsea" for no othetr reason than it has loops or threads.
KevinH


Offline Jim Sapp

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Bowl, I can't identify
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2005, 12:53:52 AM »
The bowl is commonly referred to as Nailsea-type by fairy lamp collectors.  Samuel Clarke referred to it as "Verre Morie" in his catalogs and Phoenix Glass called it "Venetian Thread" in their ads.  It is a base to a fairy lamp (fairy-size) in white Nailsea.  It also came in red, blue, and citron (green).  The following link shows how it was used:

http://tinypic.com/dwb1j9.jpg

The similar white Nailsea bowl mentioned in an eBay auction is also a fairy lamp base.  It is example, however, it is used with a "pyramid-size" fairy lamp.

Send me a pm if you are interested in selling it.

Jim.


Offline KevinH

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Bowl, I can't identify
« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2005, 01:27:21 AM »
Jim - Thanks. Yes, a fairy lamp bowl. Of course! Now it makes sense.  :)

That would probably date it at around 1880.

But as for, "commonly referred to as Nailsea-type by fairy lamp collectors", well, that may be so .... but I personally wish they would just call it "pulled up trailing". :D

Having said that, I should point out an inaccuracy in my own comments such as "... there's a lot of looped or threaded glassware ...". I should not really have included "threaded" in that, since "threading" is a different technique to "trailing" or "looping" :oops:

It's too early in the morning - 2:20am - I should go to bed.
KevinH


Offline Jim Sapp

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Bowl, I can't identify
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2005, 03:49:47 AM »
Unfortunately, "Nailsea" or "Nailsea type" is a term most often used when applied to fairy lamps.  I would prefer the name Clarke used "verre moire" but it is too difficult to pronounce and is little known to many folks.

A variant to the classical loop pattern is known as "Northwood Pull-up".  It is Nailsea-like, but as you can see, much different in pattern.  How it got to be known as "Northwood Pull-up" is beyond me.  

I also found a better photo of the white nailsea fairy lamp base:

http://tinypic.com/dwcsw4.jpg

And, an example of what is referred to as "Northwood Pull-up"

http://tinypic.com/dwct1t.jpg

This example is sitting on a Clarke lamp cup but it is not a Clarke fairy lamp shade.  Clarke didn't actually make any fairy lamps but commissioned other glass companies to make them for him.


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Bowl, I can't identify
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2005, 07:31:42 PM »
Thank you Jim, it is lovely to find out what the bowl is.  
I would not sell it though because it is an heirloom.
Thankyou KevH for the Nailsea site.
Cheers Ruth.


 

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