Author Topic: Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!  (Read 2376 times)

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Offline glasswizard

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Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!
« on: August 25, 2005, 09:45:50 AM »
I have had this vase for a very long time. At one time I suspected Richardson, but since I am not that familiar with English glass, although thanks to all of you I am learning, I thought I would post it and see what kind of response it entails It is apprx. 14 inches tall has a lot of wear to the base which also has what looks like a huge ground and polished pontil.

(http://tinypic.com/b53doo.jpg)

The gold decoration to me is rather a distraction. It is very worn in spots and around the neck missing entirely in areas. It is a translucent green and surprised me when I was playing with my blacklight.
So would it be opaline? Not sure exactly what to call it. Terry
(http://tinypic.com/b6anlu.jpg)


Offline Ivo

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Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2005, 08:42:33 AM »
It whispers "Italy, fifties" to me.... :shock:
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Offline glasswizard

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Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2005, 07:31:51 AM »
After more research, it whispers many things to me now, but not Italy fifities. The bottom  is what makes me shy away from Italy.
I would expect a flat bottom if Italian. http://tinypic.com/b53yc4.jpg
Further research such as The Great glass library, category English other, items 7107 and 7120 shows  possible Richardson pieces. I now can say with confidence it is opaline glass. The French were great producers of Opaline, but the gilding on mine is applied thinly, hence the wear and IMHO without the extravagance exhibited on French examples. Terry


Connie

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Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2005, 08:52:00 AM »
Terry -

I love your vase.  I always thought opaline was white or off-white.  I would describe the vase you show as jade glass (or the lack of a better term in my vocabulary.)  Where did you find a good definition for opaline and could you please share it with us?


Offline David555

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Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2005, 03:16:24 AM »
With that black light making it glow  :?  it has a hefty dose of Uranium in it - hence the name 'Uranium Glass' - for the last 200 years manufacturers have been adding it to glass - 'it adds a quality' - but really only if you have black light which is a recent development - they all look like normal vases is normal conditions, so I have always wondered why they did this - the only company it seems to make a difference to are Webb C Burma ware - there is a daylight glow there for sure, but a lot of Uranium - any info on why for so many others is of interest to me
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Offline Glassyone

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Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2005, 03:58:54 AM »
This is intrigueing! It' s lovely.
It is a good example to practice on. It looks British to me, nicely balanced with a flare up to to the rim and the curve finishing somewhere in between a British and Bohemian vase.
The foot looks blown and compressed but not quite as wide as a British example would be in comparision to the top.  
The rim is rounded which is more 'British'.
Perhaps it was a Richardson 'Bohemian type'!
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Offline glasswizard

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Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2005, 10:08:02 AM »
Connie, your question about a definition of Opaline got me to pondering. Its one of those words I think now used without much thought and on my part guilty I am afraid. Ivo in his book Glass Fact File a-z gives a wonderful definition. Opaline is a type of glass, semitransparent. He also states similar to Bristol glass. There is more and I urge anyone who needs to know to get the book. Wonderful!!!!
To keep this short (too late I know) lets say Opaline is a type of glass.
On my part, I feel like striking the word Opaline from my description until I learn more. Instead let us say a 14 inch Translucent green glass vase.
Ruth I am glad you like it and if I had to use one word as a description, it would be "Stately"
David, good question but not sure there is an easy answer as to why they used uranium. And not just in old glass, I have an iittala votive candle holder in blue, brand new that glows a soft yellow under blacklight. Terry


Offline Leni

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Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2005, 10:49:16 AM »
Quote from: "glasswizard"
Ivo in his book Glass Fact File a-z gives a wonderful definition. Opaline is a type of glass, semitransparent. He also states similar to Bristol glass. There is more and I urge anyone who needs to know to get the book. Wonderful!!!!

I agree absolutely, Terry!  I just recently bought Ivo's book!  :D

As for opaline, until recently I admit I had been guilty of thinking (or rather, of not thinking very much  :roll: ) that all opaline glass was uranium or similar  :oops:  :roll:

However, I reckon my little 'headless chicken' (Sowerby 'Swan & Bullrush') vase is definitely opaline!  It glows with wonderful 'fire' in sunlight, but shows not a trace of luminescence under black light!   :shock: http://tinypic.com/b8woeb.jpg IMHO it's a perfect example to use as a definition of 'Opaline' :shock:

And I am now trying not to make ignorant assumptions in future :oops:

Leni
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Offline KevinH

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Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2005, 07:29:37 PM »
Leni - I would have said your Sowerby piece was "Opalescent", not "Opaline".

As for Terry's green vase, I agree with the views that it has a general "British" / "Bohemian" look to it. And it does have features of mid to late 19th century work. But I also think the gilded decoration is (or was) rather ornate or fancy for what I have seen of British items and I would not be surprised to find out that Ivo was not so far off with the 20th century "Italian" idea.

I would have half expected that a Richardsons' vase of this type would have been marked "Richardsons Vitrified Enamel" on the base. But perhaps that was reserved only for the very best pieces?

On the question of shape, does the neck form smoothly from the shoulder of the body or is there a "ridge line"? It looks a bit "angled" to me.
KevinH


Offline Glen

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Richardson's Green vase = Unlikely!
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2005, 07:36:40 PM »
I love that Sowerby item - made more charming by its little flaw  :shock:

The colour is opalescent, as Kev notes. It is sometimes also referred to as blanc de lait (though there is a debate around that).

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