Author Topic: Clayton Mayers, Johnsen & Jorgensen, AHW and United Glass/ Sherdley/ Ravenhead  (Read 3538 times)

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Offline Heidimin

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As regards who took over making Jacobean, United Glass (Sherdley and from 1964 Ravenhead) have to be a candidate - they certainly had the machinery. I only managed to go through a fraction of the design work in the AHW collection, so there may be more clues there. I'll keep a sharp eye out next time I manage to get up there.
Heidi


Offline ChrisStewart

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Hi again,

In my previous post I mentioned that some Jacobean moulds were put to the pricing committe in the 1950s. Here is the list:

Style Number   Description                   Date
      
7268                Dish 4 1/2 to 10 1/2      1951
7273                Honey                         1952
7276                Tomato dish                 1952
7279                cream                         1952
7280                Sugar                         1952
7354                Jar 4 inches                 1952
7711                Ash Tray                     1954
8121                Salad Plate                  1953
8560                Mustard                      1952
8747                Candlestick                  1953
9051                Biscuit                        1952
9055                Tray Triple                   1952
9140                cruet                          1952
9360                Cream                         1952

Regards

Chris
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Sklounion

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Hi,
The probability is that many of the answers and much of the information is in this archive:
United Glass company records etc 1856-1976, GB/NNAF/B25085, held at Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies, Hertford.
Although flagged up on GMB, some three years ago, I have not the best geographical location to visit it easily.
Regards,
Marcus


Offline Glen

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My knowledge of 'Jacobean' is focused on the earlier production, so I can't add much to this discourse. I can, however, say how interesting it is. Thanks to all involved.

Glen
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Offline Adam

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Chris - You asked for my comments re the situation at Davidsons when Claude Fraser died.  I knew even less about their overall financial situation than I did about that at Sowerbys, which wasn't much.  However, they were certainly hard up and, at the sharp end, there were critical repairs in the factory not being done.  I would be astonished if there were any capital available for anything, and most certainly not for anything like auto production.

Re Clayton Meyers, at that time and for the following couple of years until I left, considerable numbers of toughened tumblers were still being made but nothing else.  I assumed all the tumblers went to CM, but I could be wrong on that.

Adam D.


Offline Heidimin

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Quote
The probability is that many of the answers and much of the information is in this archive:
United Glass company records etc 1856-1976, GB/NNAF/B25085, held at Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies, Hertford.

Hi, Marcus.

Yes, it's been on my hit-list for a while too. Your post inspired me to check on-line, but I can't find anything via their search facility (either company name or catalogue reference). Before I contact them direct, can you tell me where you got the information from? (I tried A2A and didn't get any relevant hits either.)

The good news is that I've discovered that Hertfordshire Archives are open on Saturday mornings. So that destroys one excuse for not going up there...
Heidi


Sklounion

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Hi Heidi,
I think that when I posted this on the board, I had been checking acquisitions made by the National Archives and the Historic Manuscripts Commission. The thread in question was this one:
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,2415.msg17729.html#msg17729
Regards,
Marcus


Sklounion

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Adam wrote:
Quote
Re Clayton Meyers, at that time and for the following couple of years until I left, considerable numbers of toughened tumblers were still being made but nothing else.  I assumed all the tumblers went to CM,
That would be much as expected, Adam, as this would have been a licensing issue, negotiated by CM and Davidsons, early in 1940. Crystolac toughened tumblers distribution was exclusively a Clayton Mayers issue.
Regards,
Marcus


Offline Anne

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Adam, can you add anything about how the tumblers were made please? If this was a big wartime contract for the NAAFI the numbers would have been immense, were they really all produced by hand-pressing?   :o  What sort of daily production would there be and how many people would it take to produce so many?


Sklounion

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Clayton Mayers were always looking for ways to keep the price down and at the start of the war they turned to making machine-made Jacobean glassware.

Asking for a time out here....

definitions are not clear....

So define what we understand/they meant by machine-made....

The changes in the Czech industry of the period, was between presses such as the manual Kutzer press in use since 1909 or earlier, to hydraulic presses, which occurred @ 40-50 years later...
Automatic lines appeared in the mid-1950s.

Definitions, and accuracy is essential to our understanding, and this requires that we cannot assume automatic or semi-automatic production lines, came into use, and I remain to be convinced that this change came in the early years of WWII. I would be surprised if major new technological developments for the production of domestic/utility glass would have been allowed, when military production was given precedence.

Regards,

Marcus

 



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