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Author Topic: A Little More Info on Royo Glass  (Read 18228 times)

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Offline krsilber

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Re: A Little More Info on Royo Glass
« Reply #50 on: November 19, 2008, 12:55:40 AM »
I agree in a general sense, though I've seen signed Royo pieces that were beautifully and precisely executed.  Spanish glass is more playful, less restrained.  The Bohemian potash-lime glass also wasn't as suited to the rigaree and detail as Spanish soda-lime was.  It seems there's sometimes a qualitative difference in the enamel itself.  More streaky on Spanish glass. 

Lobmeyr only made their own glass for a short period.  Most of it was made by Meyr's Neffe.  Moser's (and most other Bohemian companies') glass was based on a Meyr's Neffe formula.  (This is all referring to pre-1930 or so.)

Chickens are popular on glass!  In the US, anyway.  I thought it extended elsewhere, maybe not.  It's usually related to cocktails, now that I think about it.  I love those chicken stoppers!

Did Hazespain get chased off?
Kristi


"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science."

- Albert Einstein

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Sklounion

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Re: A Little More Info on Royo Glass
« Reply #51 on: November 20, 2008, 09:21:54 AM »
I am not sure why the bolt-hedys in the armorial is anything remarkable, other than Spain does bulls. The bolt-hedys is relatively common in central and east european heraldry, and I believe was used by Mecklenburg family, as well as other noble families.

Regards,

Marcus

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Offline Della

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Re: A Little More Info on Royo Glass
« Reply #52 on: November 23, 2008, 10:05:37 PM »
Quote from: Kristi
Lobmeyr only made their own glass for a short period.  Most of it was made by Meyr's Neffe.  Moser's (and most other Bohemian companies') glass was based on a Meyr's Neffe formula.  (This is all referring to pre-1930 or so.)

May I ask, where the assumption comes from that Moser, and most other Bohemian companies' relied on Meyr's Neffe formula? Moser's standard glass formula was for unleaded glass. Is there primary source evidence for this statement, or merely secondary materials?

Della
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If I know, I'll comment. If I think I know, I'll have a go. If I have no idea, I'll just keep quiet and learn from others, so the next time I'll know.

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Offline krsilber

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Re: A Little More Info on Royo Glass
« Reply #53 on: November 24, 2008, 04:54:27 PM »
In Baldwin's Moser Artistic Glass it says, "From approximately 1850-1930, most Bohemian crystal produced was based on a formulation developed at Meyr's Neffe...After the opening of the Meierhofen works, Moser engaged in the develpment of improved formulations of Bohemian crystal."  So it's secodary materials I got the information from.  Here "crystal" is used in the American sense, meaning colorless glass.  It doesn't mean that the formula used by other companies was identical to that used by Meyr's Neffe, but evidently they were the first to develop the potash-lime glass commonly used in Bohemia from 1850; before then it was apparently a lime glass without much in the way of soda or potash.


I stand corrected, the bull on the tumbler on the Wolf site isn't relevant.
Kristi


"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science."

- Albert Einstein

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Offline krsilber

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Re: A Little More Info on Royo Glass
« Reply #54 on: November 25, 2008, 06:15:36 PM »
Just yesterday I noticed in the ebay listing that JP pointed out there's a mark on the bottom, "RC 31/M.A."  Has anyone seen a similar mark on Royo designs?
Kristi


"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science."

- Albert Einstein

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Offline Versacrum

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Re: A Little More Info on Royo Glass
« Reply #55 on: November 18, 2010, 10:08:29 AM »
FYI, only a few years late: there is a vase signed E. Riera on Ebay at the moment, item no. 250727103617.  If you have trouble with the search go to German Ebay (Ebay.de).  The vase is in the UK, it seems. 

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