Author Topic: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?  (Read 1980 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline glasstrufflehunter

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 583
    • My Yahoo 360 page & Paperweight Blog
Re: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?
« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2008, 03:12:02 AM »
The fracture flows with the 'grain' of the glass. The design of the weight is accomplished with a pick so some areas are a little more compressed and dense so the fracture travels along the path of least resistance which is around the design in some places.

I have a very large collection of paperweights and have been collecting them for years. I've had a couple weights develop fractures like this. It's usually due to improper annealing or the piece being subjected to too extreme a temperature ie. sitting in the sun on a windowsill.

I have one Italian weight that is showing signs of a fracture traveling between the layer with the design and the outer layer. I have an American weight with a fracture that travels in six directions almost in a snowflake like manner.
I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog


Offline Zatzafrazz

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 20
  • Gender: Female
Re: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?
« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2008, 03:47:02 AM »
Here are 3 more photos/images of the fracture. Please take a look. Let me know if you still think it's a fracture. I really think I am going to buy it. Even if it is damaged, because I really like it. At least I'm getting ripped-off with my eyes wide open this time. No regrets later  :chky:

http://i494.photobucket.com/albums/rr308/Zatzafrazz/2008_0112Pictures0001.jpg
http://i494.photobucket.com/albums/rr308/Zatzafrazz/2008_0112Pictures0003.jpg
http://i494.photobucket.com/albums/rr308/Zatzafrazz/2008_0112Pictures0004.jpg

Thanks!!
The more I learn, the more confused I become.


Offline glasstrufflehunter

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 583
    • My Yahoo 360 page & Paperweight Blog
Re: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?
« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2008, 04:21:49 AM »
Yup it's a fracture.

But the paperweight does look pretty old and interesting. Haggle with the seller and let them know it's cracked and maybe you can get a good deal.
I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog


Offline Zatzafrazz

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 20
  • Gender: Female
Re: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?
« Reply #13 on: October 29, 2008, 10:47:21 PM »
 :cry: The shopkeeper won't give me discount!! (I asked for 50% off) he insists that it isn't fractured. He is claiming that it is designed that was so you don't see the unsightly bottom of the weight when you view it from front or the side. And he seems right because you can look at it from the bottom and see right through the whole weight. But when you view it from the top you can only see to the fracture and it reflects silvery like a mirror. Is this typical of a fracture? Tell me true because I am this close to paying full price!! I'm weak!
The more I learn, the more confused I become.


Offline alexander

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 547
  • Gender: Male
Re: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?
« Reply #14 on: October 29, 2008, 10:58:35 PM »
Hi, this is a standard paperweight fracture that shows up most frequently with older weights,
I own several paperweights with this kind of fault. These fractures are easy for collectors to spot,
but can be mistaken for something else by someone not versed in paperweights.

The silvery sheen is what you expect to see when a fracture is present.

There is no doubt in my mind that this is a fracture.

It is most assuredly not designed that way, and happened due to either improper annealing as Glasstruffle pointed out,
or some kind of external stress ( ie temperature swings, falling off shelf etc.)

Glass is a very interesting material and behaves strangely sometimes, you can have all kinds of fractures throught a
paperweight yet it stays in one piece, and might not show any surface faults at all.
Alexander
Norwegian glass collector


Offline glasstrufflehunter

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 583
    • My Yahoo 360 page & Paperweight Blog
Re: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?
« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2008, 11:17:49 PM »
That mirrorlike reflection from fractures is actually very pretty.

The paperweight seems old from the wear on the base but I can't tell just how old. I wouldn't go above 25 for it.

I am a cheapskate.  ;D
I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog


Offline Zatzafrazz

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 20
  • Gender: Female
Re: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?
« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2008, 11:26:56 PM »
THANK YOU!! I'm am going down to that shop. I am buying that weight. And I am going to pay half price! He is not going to pull the wool over my eyes.

Are there any good reference books on paperweights? this will be the fourth one I've bought and I keep seeing more that I want, so I guess it's a hobby for me now. I should at least be able to tell fracture from design. Especially since i am most drawn to the older weights.

I'll be right back with my weight!
 :thup:
The more I learn, the more confused I become.


Offline glasstrufflehunter

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 583
    • My Yahoo 360 page & Paperweight Blog
Re: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?
« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2008, 11:52:59 PM »
I have three that I like:

A classic is Paul Hollister's The Encyclopedia of Glass Paperweights. He covers the antique makers and makes brief mention of modern makers. He wrote the book before the current paperweight renaissance took off.

Paperweights of the World by Monika Fleming and Peter Pommerencke has superb photos of both antique and modern paperweights.

My favourite book is The Art of the Paperweight by Lawrence Selman. Lots of beautiful photos of antique and modern as well as pictures of paperweights being made. This book is quite expensive but keep your eyes peeled on eBay. I found mine for 25.

You will drool, drool, drool looking at the 2nd and 3rd books especially.

Other board members will have favourites they recommend as well.

Collect the books like you do the paperweights: Having a shelf full of them can only help you.

I collect Scottish and Italian paperweights and anything else that strikes my fancy.

My Paperweight Blog


Offline KevinH

  • Global Moderator
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 4556
    • England
Re: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?
« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2008, 12:32:01 AM »
Quote
Are there any good reference books on paperweights?
Yes, there are many! For a quick look at an easy to browse list, go to the book page at Sweetbriar Gallery. You will see that some of the books are quite expensive, while others are very reasonably priced. Also check out sites like Amazon with a search for "paperweights".

If you have a good library nearby, you may be able to browse some paperweight books and get an idea of the different types of content.

The book Paperweights, Historicism, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, 1840-Present by Peter Von Breckel is the only one that I know which illustrates lots of older European weights. It includes examples like the one discussed here. The book is an excellent reference but is not cheap (US $70 when new in 1999).

Maybe I will think about putting some paperweight book reviews in the "Glass Books" forum?

As for the weight with the fracture (yes - it's a fracture - no doubt about it), I hope that you are able to buy it at a fair price (i.e. very cheap) as it will be a good reference piece. That type of weight is very likley Bohemian / Czechoslovakian from later 19th century to early 20th century (c1890 to c1920), but broadly similar weights have been made elsewhere.
KevinH


Offline Sach

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 125
Re: Any Thoughts on this large paperweight?
« Reply #19 on: October 30, 2008, 01:18:41 AM »

The book Paperweights, Historicism, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, 1840-Present by Peter Von Breckel is the only one that I know which illustrates lots of older European weights. It includes examples like the one discussed here. The book is an excellent reference but is not cheap (US $70 when new in 1999).
reference piece. That type of weight is very likely Bohemian / Czechoslovakian from later 19th century to early 20th century (c1890 to c1920), but broadly similar weights have been made elsewhere.

I've got an extensive collection of paperweight books but this one is new to me.  Also I find no reference to it on Amazon.com nor any hits on Google.  What can you tell me about the publisher or any source likely to have a copy available?

 



This Website is provided by Angela Bowey, PO Box 113, Paihia 0247, New Zealand