Author Topic: Walsh fruit bowl  (Read 1602 times)

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Offline Glassyone

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Walsh fruit bowl
« on: September 02, 2005, 11:46:02 PM »
This is 'Pompeian' glass, I believe.
It has one burst bubble, which I did because we have used it as a fuit bowl for years. It's 16cm high and a very useful 30cm across. It's one of my favourite pieces of glass.  

Could one of you Walsh enthusiasts please tell me whether it would be difficult to find another and what could I expect to pay?
I have taken it out of service for the time being because the kids are now old enough to be nervous about damageing it!  

http://tinypic.com/bj93f8.jpg
Thanks Ruth


Offline paradisetrader

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Walsh fruit bowl
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2005, 09:57:45 PM »
Ruth
Bernard is the real expert here on JWW and it's not easy even for him.

I do notice however that your bowl is flourescing wildy under house (?) flourescent (?) lights + I guess the camera flash. That COULD be a positive indication for JWW Pompeian but there's an aweful lot more to it than that.

You should read this thread
Bubbled glass & trailed glass for ID please
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,1072.0.html
where Bernard explains the some of the difficulties of attributing this glass.

Try this Walsh Walsh thread for some fun too
Bubble Glass Vase
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,167.0.html
Good luck ! Peter
Pete


Offline Glassyone

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Walsh fruit bowl
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2005, 12:36:53 AM »
I based my attribution on this! It is a clear stamp.
I am enjoying the Walsh posts, thanks.
I thought the bowl was 'birefringeant' glass . It looks yellow in dull light and a crazy green in even slight sunlight but am learning that's the uranium getting excited. It must have cartloads of it in it.
 
http://tinypic.com/dc7r6v.jpg

Ruth


Anonymous

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Walsh fruit bowl
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2005, 02:25:32 AM »
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,167.0.html and quote

'1b. Early Walsh Pompeian trade samples. Not in the Factory pattern books, these rarities are marked "Walsh". Three are known to me, one of which is illustrated at plate 21 (ii), despite the plate's slightly erroneous caption. My example of this bowl has the distinction of carrying the faintest Walsh mark I have ever found, in fact just the central part - "/als".'

Thanks for that Peter.

I have so enjoyed using it as a fruit bowl for the last 10 years, it meant seeing it and appreciating it all the time. However it may have caused it one broken bubble and one small chip from the foot.Perhaps when I live on my own with 20 cats it can come back into service. Here are some better pics.
http://tinypic.com/dca0xd.jpg
http://tinypic.com/dca1x4.jpg
 
I think that it is the real McCoy. Based on the glorious shape and ring, the utterly wild colour it goes in sun and the stamp.
If not it's just as good!

ruth

 :D  :lol:


Offline Glassyone

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Walsh fruit bowl
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2005, 02:34:26 AM »
One reason for going from logged in to not and becoming a 'guest', is when one's son uses 'simple file shredder' which has the effect of  knocking out all the automatic logins. This is a good thing because it protects all the internet banking details. It does mean having to check log in status before posting.

Just in case others are subject to teen computer sharing and have not been informed.
Ruth


Offline Bernard C

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Walsh fruit bowl
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2005, 06:41:40 AM »
Ruth — Glad you and Peter enjoy my rambling on about Walsh!

As for matching your bowl, you might find it takes a lifetime.   While Pompeian was made in some quantity, I don't find the larger styles and rarer colours easy to acquire in reasonably good condition without faults like damaged or burst bubbles.

Leni took some photographs of my stand at Woking on Monday last and kindly made them available to us all.   If you look on the table in this main image, you will see three Pompeian bowls.   On the extreme left is a large blue unfooted bowl; centre front is the uranium yellow trade sample with the faint company mark that I've discussed in other topics; and just behind it is a uranium green footed bowl, very similar in shape to your own.    To the left of the trade sample is a small candlestick in pink (cased ruby or "cranberry") Pompeian, and slightly further to the left an amethyst bottle vase.    Behind the green bowl you will see a footed trumpet vase and a rare tall candlestick, both also in uranium green Pompeian.

The point I am making is that all genuine Pompeian looks good together whether all one colour or a mixture of colours, as there is a very obvious consistency of design and manufacture throughout the whole range.   I am convinced that it was all made by one master glassblower, but, unlike engraved glass, where we know the surnames of the individual master craftsmen, the factory pattern books do not enlighten us.

I have three suggestions.   Firstly, take Eric's book and a magnifying glass with you when you are looking for the glass, to help you determine whether unmarked examples are Pompeian or not.    Secondly, always examine potential purchases in daylight as artificial light can distort colours, as, for example, at Woking under those dreadful yellow sodium lights.   Thirdly, try to be as flexible as possible in style and colour when choosing other items to complement your lovely bowl.

Of course, Leni's photograph shows a small selection of my stock.   If you or anyone else is interested in any of my glass (I do not collect — it is all for sale), then please email me for details, either directly or via eBay.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Glassyone

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Walsh fruit bowl
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2005, 06:51:25 AM »
Oh my G, there is my bowl at the bottom, in the middle.

Now how much would you ask for  to sell it to me? What does the base look like? I WANT IT.

Ruth


Offline Bernard C

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Walsh fruit bowl
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2005, 07:07:55 AM »
Ruth — If I respond to your lovely last message in any way on this Glass Forum, I will be zapped by Frank and excommunicated by Angela!   So, as I said above, please email me for details, either directly by clicking the email button below this message, or via eBay.

Bernard C.  8)   :lol:
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Anonymous

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Walsh fruit bowl
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2005, 07:53:25 AM »
I have never seen any "pompeian" close up but I do know the difference between Empoli, Verre Antique from Gobbe-Hocquemiller (Braine-le-Comte), Art-et-Verre from Lodelinsart (both Belgium), Exbor in Czechslovakia, Skruf in Sweden, Biot in France and Maastricht/ Leerdam in Holland who have all made green bubble glass in the rustic style - and I'm sure there are others in Germany, too. None of the above glow, by the way....

Ruth, I would have attributed your bowl to Empoli but if Bernhard confirms it is Walsh Walsh then Walsh Walsh it is. (phew - I just had to get that phrase out in the open*)  The marked example (while it has to be Walsh Walsh) is almost identical to the Verre Antique line from the 1970s - so confusion is rife.

Ivo


* saw "league of extraordinary gentlemen" last week in which a cruel scenarist lands Sean Connery with the line "those are peasant settlements"  :P


Anonymous

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Walsh fruit bowl
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2005, 08:03:52 AM »
I am sure my bowl is Walsh, who would bother to copy it and acid stamp the base in this way?

It is not worth enough for anyone to do that.

Even if they did, it is so lovely, good luck to them. It is not only gorgeous but utterly functional.

Ruth

 

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